The Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone Mechanism

Advertisements
Advertisements

Related Posts:


In the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone mechanism, increasing angiotensin II will stimulate the production of antidiuretic hormone and aldosterone. In addition to renin, the kidneys produce erythropoietin, which stimulates the production of red blood cells, further increasing blood volume.

Source: OpenStax Anatomy and Physiology

OpenStax Anatomy and Physiology

The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone mechanism has a major effect upon the cardiovascular system. Renin is an enzyme, although because of its importance in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone pathway, some sources identify it as a hormone. Specialized cells in the kidneys found in the juxtaglomerular apparatus respond to decreased blood flow by secreting renin into the blood. Renin converts the plasma protein angiotensinogen, which is produced by the liver, into its active form—angiotensin I. Angiotensin I circulates in the blood and is then converted into angiotensin II in the lungs. This reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE).

Angiotensin II is a powerful vasoconstrictor, greatly increasing blood pressure. It also stimulates the release of ADH and aldosterone, a hormone produced by the adrenal cortex. Aldosterone increases the reabsorption of sodium into the blood by the kidneys. Since water follows sodium, this increases the reabsorption of water. This in turn increases blood volume, raising blood pressure. Angiotensin II also stimulates the thirst center in the hypothalamus, so an individual will likely consume more fluids, again increasing blood volume and pressure.

Source:

Betts, J. G., Young, K. A., Wise, J. A., Johnson, E., Poe, B., Kruse, D. H., … DeSaix, P. (n.d.). Anatomy and Physiology. Houston, Texas: OpenStax. Access for free at: https://openstax.org/details/books/anatomy-and-physiology

Advertisements
Advertisements