T Cell Development and Differentiation

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Differentiation of T Cells within the Thymus.

Source: OpenStax Anatomy and Physiology

OpenStax Anatomy and Physiology

The process of eliminating T cells that might attack the cells of one’s own body is referred to as T cell tolerance. While thymocytes are in the cortex of the thymus, they are referred to as “double negatives,” meaning that they do not bear the CD4 or CD8 molecules that you can use to follow their pathways of differentiation. In the cortex of the thymus, they are exposed to cortical epithelial cells. In a process known as positive selection, double-negative thymocytes bind to the MHC molecules they observe on the thymic epithelia, and the MHC molecules of “self” are selected. This mechanism kills many thymocytes during T cell differentiation. In fact, only two percent of the thymocytes that enter the thymus leave it as mature, functional T cells.

Later, the cells become double positives that express both CD4 and CD8 markers and move from the cortex to the junction between the cortex and medulla. It is here that negative selection takes place. In negative selection, self-antigens are brought into the thymus from other parts of the body by professional antigen-presenting cells. The T cells that bind to these self-antigens are selected for negatively and are killed by apoptosis. In summary, the only T cells left are those that can bind to MHC molecules of the body with foreign antigens presented on their binding clefts, preventing an attack on one’s own body tissues, at least under normal circumstances.

The cells that leave the thymus become single positives, expressing either CD4 or CD8, but not both (see Figure 21.18). The CD4+ T cells will bind to class II MHC and the CD8+ cells will bind to class I MHC. The discussion that follows explains the functions of these molecules and how they can be used to differentiate between the different T cell functional types.

Source:

Betts, J. G., Young, K. A., Wise, J. A., Johnson, E., Poe, B., Kruse, D. H., … DeSaix, P. (n.d.). Anatomy and Physiology. Houston, Texas: OpenStax. Access for free at: https://openstax.org/details/books/anatomy-and-physiology

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