The DNA Transposons

Transposons are segments of DNA that have the ability to move from one location to another because they code for the enzyme transposase. In this example, a nonreplicative transposon has disrupted gene B. The consequence of that the transcription of gene B may now have been interrupted.

Source: OpenStax Microbiology

OpenStax Microbiology

Genetic elements called transposons (transposable elements), or “jumping genes,” are molecules of DNA that include special inverted repeat sequences at their ends and a gene encoding the enzyme transposase. Transposons allow the entire sequence to independently excise from one location in a DNA molecule and integrate into the DNA elsewhere through a process called transposition. Transposons were originally discovered in maize (corn) by American geneticist Barbara McClintock (1902–1992) in the 1940s. Transposons have since been found in all types of organisms, both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Transposition is not prokaryote-specific. Most transposons are nonreplicative, meaning they move in a “cut-and-paste” fashion. Some may be replicative, however, retaining their location in the DNA while making a copy to be inserted elsewhere (“copy and paste”). Because transposons can move within a DNA molecule, from one DNA molecule to another, or even from one cell to another, they have the ability to introduce genetic diversity. Movement within the same DNA molecule can alter phenotype by inactivating or activating a gene.

Transposons may carry with them additional genes, moving these genes from one location to another with them. For example, bacterial transposons can relocate antibiotic resistance genes, moving them from chromosomes to plasmids. This mechanism has been shown to be responsible for the colocalization of multiple antibiotic resistance genes on a single R plasmid in Shigella strains causing bacterial dysentery. Such an R plasmid can then be easily transferred among a bacterial population through the process of conjugation.

Source:

Parker, N., Schneegurt, M., Thi Tu, A.-H., Forster, B. M., & Lister, P. (n.d.). Microbiology. Houston, Texas: OpenStax. Access for free at: https://openstax.org/details/books/microbiology


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