The Vector Transmission

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vector transmission
(a) A mechanical vector carries a pathogen on its body from one host to another, not as an infection. (b) A biological vector carries a pathogen from one host to another after becoming infected itself.

OpenStax Microbiology

The Vector Transmission (OpenStax Microbiology)

Diseases can also be transmitted by a mechanical or biological vector, an animal (typically an arthropod) that carries the disease from one host to another. Mechanical transmission is facilitated by a mechanical vector, an animal that carries a pathogen from one host to another without being infected itself. For example, a fly may land on fecal matter and later transmit bacteria from the feces to food that it lands on; a human eating the food may then become infected by the bacteria, resulting in a case of diarrhea or dysentery.

Biological transmission occurs when the pathogen reproduces within a biological vector that transmits the pathogen from one host to another. Arthropods are the main vectors responsible for biological transmission. Most arthropod vectors transmit the pathogen by biting the host, creating a wound that serves as a portal of entry. The pathogen may go through part of its reproductive cycle in the gut or salivary glands of the arthropod to facilitate its transmission through the bite. For example, hemipterans (called “kissing bugs” or “assassin bugs”) transmit Chagas disease to humans by defecating when they bite, after which the human scratches or rubs the infected feces into a mucous membrane or break in the skin.

Biological insect vectors include mosquitoes, which transmit malaria and other diseases, and lice, which transmit typhus. Other arthropod vectors can include arachnids, primarily ticks, which transmit Lyme disease and other diseases, and mites, which transmit scrub typhus and rickettsial pox. Biological transmission, because it involves survival and reproduction within a parasitized vector, complicates the biology of the pathogen and its transmission. There are also important non-arthropod vectors of disease, including mammals and birds. Various species of mammals can transmit rabies to humans, usually by means of a bite that transmits the rabies virus. Chickens and other domestic poultry can transmit avian influenza to humans through direct or indirect contact with avian influenza virus A shed in the birds’ saliva, mucous, and feces.

(credit “Black fly”, “Tick”, “Tsetse fly”: modification of work by USDA; credit: “Flea”: modification of work by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; credit: “Louse”, “Mosquito”, “Sand fly”: modification of work by James Gathany, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; credit “Kissing bug”: modification of work by Glenn Seplak; credit “Mite”: modification of work by Michael Wunderli)

Related Topic: The Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases

Related Research: Research Article: Learning infectious disease epidemiology in a modern framework

Source:

Parker, N., Schneegurt, M., Thi Tu, A.-H., Forster, B. M., & Lister, P. (n.d.). Microbiology. Houston, Texas: OpenStax. Access for free at: https://openstax.org/details/books/microbiology

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Vector-borne diseases

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