What is Acute Inflammation?

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a) a diagram of a wound in the skin that has let pathogens enter. Mast cells release histamines which signal to cells in the blood stream. B) The cells have left the blood stream; these phagocytes are engulfing the pathogens.
(a) Mast cells detect injury to nearby cells and release histamine, initiating an inflammatory response. (b) Histamine increases blood flow to the wound site, and increased vascular permeability allows fluid, proteins, phagocytes, and other immune cells to enter infected tissue. These events result in the swelling and reddening of the injured site, and the increased blood flow to the injured site causes it to feel warm. Inflammation is also associated with pain due to these events stimulating nerve pain receptors in the tissue. The interaction of phagocyte PRRs with cellular distress signals and PAMPs and opsonins on the surface of pathogens leads to the release of more proinflammatory chemicals, enhancing the inflammatory response.

Source: OpenStax Microbiology

OpenStax Microbiology

An early, if not immediate, response to tissue injury is acute inflammation. Immediately following an injury, vasoconstriction of blood vessels will occur to minimize blood loss. The amount of vasoconstriction is related to the amount of vascular injury, but it is usually brief. Vasoconstriction is followed by vasodilation and increased vascular permeability, as a direct result of the release of histamine from resident mast cells. Increased blood flow and vascular permeability can dilute toxins and bacterial products at the site of injury or infection. They also contribute to the five observable signs associated with the inflammatory response: erythema (redness), edema (swelling), heat, pain, and altered function. Vasodilation and increased vascular permeability are also associated with an influx of phagocytes at the site of injury and/or infection. This can enhance the inflammatory response because phagocytes may release proinflammatory chemicals when they are activated by cellular distress signals released from damaged cells, by PAMPs, or by opsonins on the surface of pathogens. Activation of the complement system can further enhance the inflammatory response through the production of the anaphylatoxin C5a. The image above illustrates a typical case of acute inflammation at the site of a skin wound.

During the period of inflammation, the release of bradykinin causes capillaries to remain dilated, flooding tissues with fluids and leading to edema. Increasing numbers of neutrophils are recruited to the area to fight pathogens. As the fight rages on, pus forms from the accumulation of neutrophils, dead cells, tissue fluids, and lymph. Typically, after a few days, macrophages will help to clear out this pus. Eventually, tissue repair can begin in the wounded area.

Source:

Parker, N., Schneegurt, M., Thi Tu, A.-H., Forster, B. M., & Lister, P. (n.d.). Microbiology. Houston, Texas: OpenStax. Access for free at: https://openstax.org/details/books/microbiology

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