The Chlamydia

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a) Micrograph showing brown coloration inside cells. B) photo of a swollen region on either side of the penis.
(a) Chlamydia trachomatis inclusion bodies within McCoy cell monolayers. Inclusion bodies are distinguished by their brown color. (b) Lymphogranuloma venereum infection can cause swollen lymph nodes in the groin called buboes. (credit a: modification of work by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; credit b: modification of work by Herbert L. Fred and Hendrik A. van Dijk)

OpenStax Microbiology

Chlamydia trachomatis is the causative agent of the STI chlamydia. While many Chlamydia infections are asymptomatic, chlamydia is a major cause of nongonococcal urethritis (NGU) and may also cause epididymitis and orchitis in men. In women, chlamydia infections can cause urethritis, salpingitis, and PID. In addition, chlamydial infections may be associated with an increased risk of cervical cancer.

Because chlamydia is widespread, often asymptomatic, and has the potential to cause substantial complications, routine screening is recommended for sexually active women who are under age 25, at high risk (i.e., not in a monogamous relationship), or beginning prenatal care.

Certain serovars of C. trachomatis can cause an infection of the lymphatic system in the groin known as lymphogranuloma venereum. This condition is commonly found in tropical regions and can also co-occur in conjunction with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. After the microbes invade the lymphatic system, buboes (large lymph nodes) form and can burst, releasing pus through the skin. The male genitals can become greatly enlarged and in women the rectum may become narrow.

Urogenital infections caused by C. trachomatis can be treated using azithromycin or doxycycline (the recommended regimen from the CDC). Erythromycin, levofloxacin, and ofloxacin are alternatives.

Source:

Parker, N., Schneegurt, M., Thi Tu, A.-H., Forster, B. M., & Lister, P. (n.d.). Microbiology. Houston, Texas: OpenStax. Access for free at: https://openstax.org/details/books/microbiology

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