Image Gallery: Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah

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Wikipedia

Bryce Canyon National Park is an American national park located in southwestern Utah. The major feature of the park is Bryce Canyon, which despite its name, is not a canyon, but a collection of giant natural amphitheaters along the eastern side of the Paunsaugunt Plateau. Bryce is distinctive due to geological structures called hoodoos, formed by frost weathering and stream erosion of the river and lake bed sedimentary rocks. The red, orange, and white colors of the rocks provide spectacular views for park visitors. Bryce Canyon National Park is much smaller, and sits at a much higher elevation than nearby Zion National Park. The rim at Bryce varies from 8,000 to 9,000 feet (2,400 to 2,700 m).

Bryce Canyon Estimated Location: 37.623541, -112.166565

Looking northeast from Sunset Point.

Bryce Canyon National Park lies within the Colorado Plateau geographic province of North America and straddles the southeastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau west of the Paunsaugunt Fault (Paunsaugunt is Paiute for “home of the beaver”). Park visitors arrive from the plateau part of the park and look over the plateau’s edge toward a valley containing the fault and the Paria River just beyond it (Paria is Paiute for “muddy or elk water”). The edge of the Kaiparowits Plateau bounds the opposite side of the valley.

Part of Wall Street south of Sunset Point.

The Bryce Canyon area shows a record of deposition that spans from the last part of the Cretaceous period and the first half of the Cenozoic era. The ancient depositional environment of the region around what is now the park varied. The Dakota Sandstone and the Tropic Shale were deposited in the warm, shallow waters of the advancing and retreating Cretaceous Seaway (outcrops of these rocks are found just outside park borders). The colorful Claron Formation, from which the park’s delicate hoodoos are carved, was laid down as sediments in a system of cool streams and lakes that existed from 63 to about 40 million years ago (from the Paleocene to the Eocene epochs). Different sediment types were laid down as the lakes deepened and became shallow and as the shoreline and river deltas migrated.

Head-like formation seen from Navajo Loop Trail.

More than 400 native plant species live in the park. There are three life zones in the park based on elevation: the lowest areas of the park are dominated by dwarf forests of pinyon pine and juniper with manzanita, serviceberry, and antelope bitterbrush in between. Aspen, cottonwood, water birch, and willow grow along streams. Ponderosa pine forests cover the mid-elevations with blue spruce and Douglas fir in water-rich areas and manzanita and bitterbrush as underbrush. Douglas fir and white fir, along with aspen and Engelmann spruce, make up the forests on the Paunsaugunt Plateau. The harshest areas have limber pine and ancient Great Basin bristlecone pine, some more than 1,600 years old, holding on.

Below are the rest of the images taken at Bryce Canyon National Park.

Looking down Wall Street with the Navajo Loop Trail.
The Rim Trail near Sunset Point looking south.
Looking northeast from Sunset Point.
Looking east from Rim Trail near Sunset Point.
Looking down the Navajo Loop Trail from Sunset Point.
Looking south from Sunset Point.
Looking down part of Wall Street from Sunset Point.
Looking northeast from Sunset Point.
Looking down east from Sunset Point.
Looking east from Sunset Point.
Looking northeast from Sunset Point.
Looking east from Rim Trail near Sunset Point.
Looking south part of Wall Street from Sunset Point.
Looking south of Sunset Point.
Looking east from Rim Trail near Sunset Point.
Looking south of Sunset Point.
Fence of Rim Trail looking south near Sunset Point.
Looking northeast from Rim Trail near Sunset Point.
Looking east from Rim Trail near Sunset Point.

Source:

Images owned by Chromoscience.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bryce_Canyon_National_Park


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