Binary Acids and Bases

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binary acids. This diagram has two rows and four columns. Red arrows point left across the bottom of the figure and down at the right side and are labeled “Increasing acid strength.” Blue arrows point left across the bottom and up at the right side of the figure and are labeled “Increasing base strength.” The first column is labeled 14 at the top and two white squares are beneath it. The first has the number 6 in the upper left corner and the formula C H subscript 4 in the center along with designation Neither acid nor base. The second square contains the number 14 in the upper left corner, the formula C H subscript 4 at the center and the designation Neither acid nor base. The second column is labeled 15 at the top and two blue squares are beneath it. The first has the number 7 in the upper left corner and the formula N H subscript 3 in the center along with the designation Weak base and K subscript b equals 1.8 times 10 superscript negative 5. The second square contains the number 15 in the upper left corner, the formula P H subscript 3 at the center and the designation Very weak base and K subscript b equals 4 times 10 superscript negative 28. The third column is labeled 16 at the top and two squares are beneath it. The first is shaded tan and has the number 8 in the upper left corner and the formula H subscript 2 O in the center along with the designation neutral. The second square is shaded pink, contains the number 16 in the upper left corner, the formula H subscript 2 S at the center and the designation Weak acid and K subscript a equals 9.5 times 10 superscript negative 8. The fourth column is labeled 17 at the top and two squares are beneath it. The first is shaded pink, has the number 9 in the upper left corner and the formula H F in the center along with the designation Weak acid and K subscript a equals 6.8 times 10 superscript negative 4. The second square is shaded a deeper pink, contains the number 17 in the upper left corner, the formula H C l at the center, and the designation Strong acid.
Figure 1. The figure shows trends in the strengths of binary acids and bases. Source: OpenStax Chemistry 2e

Binary Acids and Bases (OpenStax Chemistry 2e)

In the absence of any leveling effect, the acid strength of binary compounds of hydrogen with nonmetals (A) increases as the H-A bond strength decreases down a group in the periodic table. For group 17, the order of increasing acidity is HF < HCl < HBr < HI. Likewise, for group 16, the order of increasing acid strength is H2O < H2S < H2Se < H2Te.

Across a row in the periodic table, the acid strength of binary hydrogen compounds increases with increasing electronegativity of the nonmetal atom because the polarity of the H-A bond increases. Thus, the order of increasing acidity (for removal of one proton) across the second row is CH4 < NH3 < H2O < HF; across the third row, it is SiH4 < PH3 < H2S < HCl (see Figure 1).

Source:

Flowers, P., Theopold, K., Langley, R., & Robinson, W. R. (2019, February 14). Chemistry 2e. Houston, Texas: OpenStax. Access for free at: https://openstax.org/books/chemistry-2e

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