Research Article: Adverse stroke outcomes among patients with bipolar disorder

Date Published: March 4, 2019

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Author(s): Pao-Huan Chen, Yi-Wei Kao, Ben-Chang Shia, Herng-Ching Lin, Jiunn-Horng Kang, Simona Sacco.

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0213072

Abstract

Failure to deliver the standard stroke care is suspected to be a potential reason for disproportionately high mortality among patients with co-morbid bipolar disorder (BD). Few studies have explored adverse outcomes and medical care costs concurrently (as a proxy for care intensity) among patients with BD admitted for stroke. Data for this nationwide population-based study were extracted from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, on 580 patients with BD hospitalized for stroke (the study group) and a comparison group consisting of randomly selected 1740 stroke patients without BD matched by propensity scores. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) for adverse in-hospital outcomes between study group and comparison group. We found that stroke patients with BD had significantly lower in-hospital mortality (3.28% vs. 5.63%), acute respiratory failure (2.59% vs. 5.57%), and use of mechanical ventilation (6.55% vs. 10.23%) than the comparison group. After adjusting for geographical location, urbanization level, monthly income, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and coronary heart disease, the odds of in-hospital mortality, acute respiratory failure, and use of mechanical ventilation in the BD group were 0.56 (95% CI: 0.34–0.92), 0.46 (95% CI: 0.26–0.80), and 0.63 (95% CI: 0.44–0.91), respectively. No differences were found in hospitalization costs and the length of hospital stay. With comparable hospitalization costs and length of hospital stay, we concluded that stroke patients with BD had lower in-hospital mortality and serious adverse events compared to stroke patients without BD.

Partial Text

Bipolar disorder (BD) is a serious mental illness causing a high degree of medical burden during the course of illness and with the aging process [1]. Notably, patients with BD are documented to have 2 to 4 times higher mortality and at least a 10-year reduction in life expectancy compared to the general population [1,2]. Furthermore, evidence suggests that the mortality gap has widened in recent decades [3]. Among the medical causes of excessive and premature mortality deaths among BD patients, cardiovascular diseases are recognized as the leading cause, reported in both Western and Eastern studies [4–7].

Table 1 shows the demographic characteristics and comorbidities of the study group and comparison group. Given the use of propensity-score matching, the two groups were similar on most characteristics: mean ages of the study group and comparison group were 62.3±14.8 and 62.0±14.7 years, respectively (p = 0.63), with no difference in sex, urbanization level, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and coronary heart disease distribution. However, the groups differed on geographic region (p = 0.007) and monthly income (p = 0.03). Furthermore, of the 580 patient with BD, 26.8%, 24.0%, 16.5%, 13.8% and 18.9% were diagnosed with bipolar affective disorder, depressed (ICD-9-CM code 296.5), bipolar affective disorder, manic (ICD-9-CM code 296.4), bipolar affective disorder, mixed (ICD-9-CM code 296.6) manic-depressive psychosis, unspecified (ICD-9-CM code 296.80) and others (ICD-9-CM codes 296.0, 296.7 or 296.89), respectively.

The present study may be the first to investigate in-hospital mortality and adverse event rates in stroke patients with BD. With comparable total hospitalization costs and length of stay, we found that stroke patients with BD actually had lower rates of in-hospital mortality, acute respiratory failure, and mechanical ventilation use than comparison patients without BD. On previous study had shown that the annual hospitalization cost of patients with BD for non-psychiatric causes was higher than patients without BD in Taiwan [15]. However, prior studies also revealed that admission rates for stroke among patients with BD were similar to those of the general population despite their higher risk of suffering a stroke [15, 21]. Taken together, the previous research findings suggest that the poor outcomes of stroke in patients with BD may result from the inadequate stroke care. In the present study, we have observed that, with the comparable hospitalization costs and length of hospital stay, stroke patients with BD had lower in-hospital mortality and serious adverse events compared to stroke patients without BD. The results suggest that the high mortality rates of stroke among patients with BD may possibly be reduced by optimal stroke care. Therefore, further studies utilizing the database from other health care systems are warranted to validate our present observations.

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0213072

 

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