Research Article: Association between temperature variability and daily hospital admissions for cause-specific cardiovascular disease in urban China: A national time-series study

Date Published: January 28, 2019

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Author(s): Yaohua Tian, Hui Liu, Yaqin Si, Yaying Cao, Jing Song, Man Li, Yao Wu, Xiaowen Wang, Xiao Xiang, Juan Juan, Libo Chen, Chen Wei, Pei Gao, Yonghua Hu, Sanjay Basu

Abstract: BackgroundEpidemiological studies have provided compelling evidence of associations between ambient temperature and cardiovascular disease. However, evidence of effects of daily temperature variability on cardiovascular disease is scarce and mixed. We aimed to examine short-term associations between temperature variability and hospital admissions for cause-specific cardiovascular disease in urban China.Methods and findingsWe conducted a national time-series analysis in 184 cities in China between 2014 and 2017. Data on daily hospital admissions for ischemic heart disease, heart failure, heart rhythm disturbances, and ischemic stroke were obtained from the database of Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI) including 0.28 billion enrollees. Temperature data were acquired from the China Meteorological Data Sharing Service Center. Temperature variability was calculated from the standard deviation (SD) of daily minimum and maximum temperatures over exposure days. City-specific associations between temperature variability and cardiovascular disease were examined with overdispersed Poisson models controlling for calendar time, day of the week, public holiday, and daily mean temperature and relative humidity. Random-effects meta-analyses were performed to obtain national and regional average associations. We also plotted exposure-response relationship curve using a natural cubic spline of temperature variability. There were 8.0 million hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease during the study period. At the national-average level, a 1-°C increase in temperature variability at 0–1 days (TV0–1) was associated with a 0.44% (0.32%–0.55%), 0.31% (0.20%–0.43%), 0.48% (0.01%–0.96%), 0.34% (0.01%–0.67%), and 0.82% (0.59%–1.05%) increase in hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease, ischemic heart disease, heart failure, heart rhythm disturbances, and ischemic stroke, respectively. The estimates decreased but remained significant when controlling for ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5), NO2, and SO2 pollution. The main limitation of the present study was the unavailability of data on individual exposure to temperature variability.ConclusionsOur findings suggested that short-term temperature variability exposure could increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, which may provide new insights into the health effects of climate change.

Partial Text: Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of death and disability worldwide [1,2]. Climate change has been considered potentially the greatest threat to human health of the 21st century [3–5]. In the past few decades, increasing epidemiological studies have reported associations of mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular disease with ambient temperature [6,7]. However, daily mean temperature failed to reflect intra- and interday variations of temperature. Temperature variability is an important meteorological indicator reflecting climate changes, such as rapid temperature fluctuations within a certain period (e.g., intra- and interday changes in temperature) [8,9]. It may also pose a major danger to human health. To date, however, scientific evidence is still inadequate regarding the association between daily temperature variation and cardiovascular disease morbidity, especially in developing countries. Quantifying the effect of temperature variability on cardiovascular disease has major public health implications, particularly in the context of increasing climate change and unstable weather patterns [10,11].

Table 1 presents the demographic characteristics of people enrolled in the UEBMI in the 184 Chinese cities in 2017. Of the 184 cities, 94 cities were located in south region and 90 cities were in the north. Overall, there were 54.4% male patients and 4.9% patients aged ≥75 years. The sex and age distributions of participants in the south versus north regions were similar. For the 184 cities, there were 8.0 million hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease from January 1, 2014, through December 31, 2017. S2 and S3 Tables present city-specific summary statistics on annual-average hospital admissions for cause-specific cardiovascular disease, weather variables, temperature variability, and air pollutants. Summary statistics of daily hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease, weather conditions, temperature variability, and air pollutants are presented in Table 2. On average, we recorded 44 cardiovascular admissions per day across the cities, with a range from 1 to 302. The annual-average daily mean temperature was 14.4°C, with a range from −0.2°C to 24.4°C. The annual-average TV0–1 was 5.7°C, ranging from 2.9°C to 9.3°C. The distributions of temperature variability were similar at different exposure days (TV0–1 to TV0–7). The distribution of daily temperature variability at different exposure days is presented in S4 Table.

In this national study, we found that short-term temperature variability exposure was associated with increased hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease, after controlling for daily mean temperature. The associations were more evident in the elderly but did not vary substantially by climates (annual-average temperature variability, temperature and relative humidity levels), demographic characteristics (sex and GDP per capita), and geographical region. These associations were robust to the adjustment of air pollutants (PM2.5, NO2, and SO2).

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1002738

 

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