Research Article: Association of Body Mass Index with Timing of Death during Tuberculosis Treatment

Date Published: January 13, 2017

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Author(s): Hsin-Hao Lai, Yun-Ju Lai, Yung-Feng Yen, David W. Dowdy.

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0170104

Abstract

The association between body mass index and mortality in patients with tuberculosis has not been extensively studied, and the existing evidence is inconsistent. This study aimed to investigate the impact of body mass index on timing of death in patients with tuberculosis.

All Taiwanese adults with tuberculosis in Taipei, Taiwan, were included in a retrospective cohort study in 2011–2012. Multinomial logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between body mass index and timing of death in patients with tuberculosis.

Among 1557 eligible patients, 84.1% (1310), 8.2% (128), and 7.6% (119) underwent successful treatment, early death, and late death, respectively. The mean age of the patients with tuberculosis was 64.2 years old, and 67.7% were male. After controlling for potential confounding variables, underweight with body mass index less than 18.5 kg/ m2 was significantly associated with elevated risk of all-cause mortality [Adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 1.64; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.17–2.30]. Considering timing of death, underweight with body mass index less than 18.5 was significantly associated only with elevated risk of early mortality within the first 8 weeks of treatment onset (AOR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.45–3.40)

For patients with tuberculosis infection, underweight with body mass index less than 18.5 kg/ m2 is an independent predictor for early mortality within the first 8 weeks of treatment.

Partial Text

Tuberculosis (TB) remains a common and deadly disease globally. Even though the incidence rate of TB infection has decreased since 2001, when the Millennium Development Goals were instituted, mortality caused by TB cases is still high [1].

A total of 1557 Taiwanese adults with TB infection were enrolled in this cohort study in 2011–2012, and their overall mortality rate was 15.9%. Underweight was significantly associated with elevated risk of all-cause mortality during treatment after controlling for potential confounding variables, while overweight was not. When timing of death was considered, underweight was only significantly associated with elevated mortality risk within the first 8 weeks of treatment, not later than 8 weeks after treatment onset.

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0170104

 

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