Research Article: Associations of fat mass and fat-free mass accretion in infancy with body composition and cardiometabolic risk markers at 5 years: The Ethiopian iABC birth cohort study

Date Published: August 20, 2019

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Author(s): Rasmus Wibaek, Dorte Vistisen, Tsinuel Girma, Bitiya Admassu, Mubarek Abera, Alemseged Abdissa, Marit E. Jørgensen, Pernille Kæstel, Kim F. Michaelsen, Henrik Friis, Jonathan C. K. Wells, Gregers S. Andersen, Kathleen Rasmussen

Abstract: BackgroundAccelerated growth in early childhood is an established risk factor for later obesity and cardiometabolic disease, but the relative importance of fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) accretion is not well understood. We aimed to study how FM and FFM at birth and their accretion during infancy were associated with body composition and cardiometabolic risk markers at 5 years.Methods and findingsHealthy children born at term were enrolled in the Infant Anthropometry and Body Composition (iABC) birth cohort between December 2008 and October 2012 at Jimma University Specialized Hospital in the city of Jimma, Ethiopia. FM and FFM were assessed using air displacement plethysmography a median of 6 times between birth and 6 months of age. In 507 children, we estimated individual FM and FFM at birth and their accretion over 0–3 and 3–6 months of age using linear-spline mixed-effects modelling. We analysed associations of FM and FFM at birth and their accretion in infancy with height, waist circumference, FM, FFM, and cardiometabolic risk markers at 5 years using multiple linear regression analysis. A total of 340 children were studied at the 5-year follow-up (mean age: 60.0 months; girls: 50.3%; mean wealth index: 45.5 out of 100; breastfeeding status at 4.5 to 6 months post-partum: 12.5% exclusive, 21.4% almost exclusive, 60.6% predominant, 5.5% partial/none). Higher FM accretion in infancy was associated with higher FM and waist circumference at 5 years. For instance, 100-g/month higher FM accretion in the periods 0–3 and 3–6 months was associated with 339 g (95% CI: 243–435 g, p < 0.001) and 367 g (95% CI: 250–484 g, p < 0.001) greater FM at 5 years, respectively. Higher FM at birth and FM accretion from 0 to 3 months were associated with higher FFM and cholesterol concentrations at 5 years. Associations for cholesterol were strongest for low-density lipoprotein (LDL)–cholesterol, and remained significant after adjusting for current FM. A 100-g higher FM at birth and 100-g/month higher FM accretion from 0 to 3 months were associated with 0.16 mmol/l (95% CI: 0.05–0.26 mmol/l, p = 0.005) and 0.06 mmol/l (95% CI: 0.01–0.12 mmol/l, p = 0.016) higher LDL-cholesterol at 5 years, respectively. Higher FFM at birth and FFM accretion in infancy were associated with higher FM, FFM, waist circumference, and height at 5 years. For instance, 100-g/month higher FFM accretion in the periods 0–3 and 3–6 months was associated with 1,002 g (95% CI: 815–1,189 g, p < 0.001) and 624 g (95% CI: 419–829 g, p < 0.001) greater FFM at 5 years, respectively. We found no associations of FM and FFM growth with any of the other studied cardiometabolic markers including glucose, HbA1c, insulin, C-peptide, HOMA-IR, triglycerides, and blood pressure. Non-attendance at the 5-year follow-up visit was the main limitation of this study, which may have introduced selection bias and limited the power of the regression analyses.ConclusionsFM accretion in early life was positively associated with markers of adiposity and lipid metabolism, but not with blood pressure and cardiometabolic markers related to glucose homeostasis. FFM accretion was primarily related to linear growth and FFM at 5 years.

Partial Text: Non-communicable diseases like type-2-diabetes and cardiovascular diseases are among the leading causes of death and disability worldwide [1,2]. There is mounting evidence that perturbations in fetal and early-life growth increase the risk of a wide range of metabolic disorders such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease in adulthood [3–6]. Over the last 3 decades the research focus has shifted from the consequences of fetal growth restriction, indexed by low birth weight, to the harmful effects of childhood obesity and rapid early growth on a variety of later health outcomes including body size, body composition (BC), and the risk of cardiometabolic diseases. The relative importance of fetal versus postnatal growth has been debated [7,8], but it is likely that both aspects of early growth are involved in the risk development [9,10]. Most studies relating early growth to later health have been conducted in high-income populations. However, as many low- and middle-income countries are currently undergoing rapid nutritional transition and more than 80% of the global mortality burden of non-communicable diseases already occurs in low- and middle-income countries [11], it has become increasingly important to identify critical windows of growth associated with obesity and risk of cardiometabolic diseases in these populations.

This study is reported as per the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) guideline (S1 Text). Data for the present study were collected following a prospectively written study protocol (S2 Text).

A total of 644 mother–child pairs attended the baseline examination at birth (Fig 1).

In this contemporary cohort of urban Ethiopian children, we found that FM accretion in infancy was positively associated with markers of adiposity (FM and waist circumference) at 5 years, and that higher FFM at birth and accretion in infancy were associated with FFM, FM, height, and waist circumference at 5 years. In addition, we found that higher FM accretion during fetal life, indexed by FM at birth, and higher FM accretion from 0 to 3 months predicted higher cholesterol concentrations at 5 years, with the strongest association for LDL-cholesterol. However, none of the other studied cardiometabolic markers were associated with FM or FFM at birth or their accretion during infancy.

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1002888

 

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