Research Article: Challenges of developing a cardiovascular risk calculator for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

Date Published: March 23, 2017

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Author(s): Cynthia S. Crowson, Silvia Rollefstad, George D. Kitas, Piet L. C. M. van Riel, Sherine E. Gabriel, Anne Grete Semb, Graham R. Wallace.

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0174656

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk calculators designed for use in the general population do not accurately predict the risk of CVD among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), who are at increased risk of CVD. The process of developing risk prediction models involves numerous issues. Our goal was to develop a CVD risk calculator for patients with RA.

Thirteen cohorts of patients with RA originating from 10 different countries (UK, Norway, Netherlands, USA, Sweden, Greece, South Africa, Spain, Canada and Mexico) were combined. CVD risk factors and RA characteristics at baseline, in addition to information on CVD outcomes were collected. Cox models were used to develop a CVD risk calculator, considering traditional CVD risk factors and RA characteristics. Model performance was assessed using measures of discrimination and calibration with 10-fold cross-validation.

A total of 5638 RA patients without prior CVD were included (mean age: 55 [SD: 14] years, 76% female). During a mean follow-up of 5.8 years (30139 person years), 389 patients developed a CVD event. Event rates varied between cohorts, necessitating inclusion of high and low risk strata in the models. The multivariable analyses revealed 2 risk prediction models including either a disease activity score including a 28 joint count and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28ESR) or a health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) along with age, sex, presence of hypertension, current smoking and ratio of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Unfortunately, performance of these models was similar to general population CVD risk calculators.

Efforts to develop a specific CVD risk calculator for patients with RA yielded 2 potential models including RA disease characteristics, but neither demonstrated improved performance compared to risk calculators designed for use in the general population. Challenges encountered and lessons learned are discussed in detail.

Partial Text

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have a demonstrated increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) of 1.5–2 fold compared to their peers without RA [1]. The elevated risk has been shown to be attributable to both traditional and RA-specific factors. Decision-making regarding indication for cardio-protective medication is supported by use of various CVD risk prediction algorithms. However, risk calculators designed for use in the general population do not accurately estimate the risk of CVD in patients with RA [2, 3].

Efforts to develop a specific CVD risk calculator for patients with RA yielded 2 potential models including RA disease characteristics, but neither demonstrated improved performance compared to CVD risk calculators designed for use in the general population. While it is statistically feasible to develop an RA specific CVD risk calculator by pooling resources from many centers, its ability to optimize prediction of future CVD in this patient population is questionable due to several challenges.

Our risk calculators did not demonstrate improved performance among patients with RA compared to general population CVD risk calculators. There are many issues involved in derivation of a risk calculator, which make development of a CVD risk calculator for use in patients with RA particularly challenging. These challenges should be considered by others who may attempt to make a CVD risk calculator for patients with RA and by those who seek to develop risk calculators for other purposes in other patient populations. In addition to the challenges in development of a risk calculator, there may be certain obstacles in implementation of such a calculator in clinical practice. A risk calculator that includes both cardiovascular and rheumatologic factors might require coordinated care from both a rheumatologist and a cardiologist or general practitioners to obtain all the measures needed to assess it, particularly if joint counts were required. Even patient-reported measures like the HAQ require time for calculation [48].

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0174656

 

0 0 vote
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments