Research Article: Decline in lung function rather than baseline lung function is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome: A six-year longitudinal study

Date Published: March 27, 2017

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Author(s): Soo Kyoung Kim, Ji Cheol Bae, Jong-Ha Baek, Jae Hwan Jee, Kyu Yeon Hur, Moon-Kyu Lee, Jae Hyeon Kim, Cheng Hu.

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0174228

Abstract

This study was conducted to investigate whether baseline lung function or change in lung function is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome (MS) in Koreans. We analyzed clinical and laboratory data from 3,768 Koreans aged 40–60 years who underwent medical check-ups over a six-year period between 2006 and 2012. We calculated the percent change in forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) over the study period. We tested for an association between baseline lung function or lung function change during the follow-up period and the development of MS. The 533 subjects (14.1%) developed MS after the six-year follow-up. The baseline FVC and FEV1 were not different between the subjects who developed MS after six years and the subject without MS after six years. The percent change in FVC over six years in subjects who developed MS after six years was higher than that in subjects who did not develop MS (-5.75 [-10.19 –-1.17], -3.29 [-7.69–1.09], respectively, P = 0.001). The percent change in FVC over six years was associated with MS development after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), glucose, HDL, triglyceride, waist circumferences (WC), and systolic blood pressure. However, these association was not significant after adjusting for change of BMI and change of WC over six years (P = 0.306). The greater change in vital capacity over six years of follow-up was associated with MS development, predominantly due to obesity and abdominal obesity. The prospective study is needed to determine the relationship between lung function decline and MS.

Partial Text

There are many studies that metabolic syndrome (MS) is associated type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and other disorders, such as chronic lung disease [1–3]. Impaired lung function is also associated with glucose intolerance or diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease [4–9].

Among 3,768 subjects who did not have MS at baseline, 533 (14.1%) developed MS after six years. Basal characteristics and MS components for subjects with MS at baseline, subjects with development of MS after six years, and the subjects without MS after six years are shown in Table 1. The subjects who developed MS after six years had significantly higher baseline WC, BMI, glucose, TG, and age than the subjects without MS at baseline (Table 1). The baseline FVC and FEV1 were not different between the subjects who developed MS after six years and the subject without MS after six years (Table 1). The subjects with MS at baseline showed the reduced FVC and FEV1 compared to the subject with development of MS after six years (Table 1). The cardiovascular disease was more common in the subjects with MS at baseline than subjects with development of MS after six years.

This study showed that the change in FVC over six years in subjects who developed MS after six years was higher than that in subjects who did not develop MS. Previous cross-sectional analyses have reported an inverse association between lung function and MS [9, 10, 12, 13]. These studies found that impaired lung function, particularly restrictive lung impairment, was inversely associated with MS. Our previous cross-sectional study also showed that decreased vital capacity in Korean adult male subjects was associated with MS [12]. MS prevalence was significantly higher in subjects in the lowest FVC quartile compared to those in the highest FVC quartile [12].

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0174228

 

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