Research Article: Effect of Pictorial Depth Cues, Binocular Disparity Cues and Motion Parallax Depth Cues on Lightness Perception in Three-Dimensional Virtual Scenes

Date Published: September 10, 2008

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Author(s): Michiteru Kitazaki, Hisashi Kobiki, Laurence T. Maloney, Bernhard Baune. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0003177

Abstract: Surface lightness perception is affected by scene interpretation. There is some experimental evidence that perceived lightness under bi-ocular viewing conditions is different from perceived lightness in actual scenes but there are also reports that viewing conditions have little or no effect on perceived color. We investigated how mixes of depth cues affect perception of lightness in three-dimensional rendered scenes containing strong gradients of illumination in depth.

Partial Text: Much previous research concerning lightness perception makes use of stimuli that are effectively pictures of scenes, but viewed with both eyes. With scenes viewed “bi-ocularly” in this way, there is potential conflict between pictorial cues to depth and depth cues such as binocular disparity and motion parallax that are consistent with the flat surface of the picture viewed (the term “bi-ocular” refers to viewing conditions where the observer views a picture (a two-dimensional projection) of a three-dimensional scene with both eyes [1]). There is some experimental evidence that perceived lightness under bi-ocular viewing conditions is different from perceived lightness in actual scenes (e.g. [2]) but there are also reports that viewing conditions have little or no effect on perceived color [3].

We plotted the logarithm to base 10 of luminance setting of the test surface against the distance between the surface and the observer (Figure 6, 7). We refer to these curves as “profiles.” A four-way repeated measures ANOVA (Luminance×Distance×Binocular disparity×Motion parallax) was conducted.

In three-dimensional scenes composed of neutral light sources and achromatic surfaces, the luminance of a matte surface depends on both its surface albedo and its location and orientation with respect to the light field across the scene. Stable estimation of albedo presupposes that the visual system takes into account the location and orientation of surfaces in such scenes. There is considerable experimental evidence that it does so [6], [11]–[29].

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0003177