Research Article: Evaluation of standard pyrethroid based LNs (MiraNet and MagNet) in experimental huts against pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae s.l. M’bé, Côte d’Ivoire: Potential for impact on vectorial capacity

Date Published: April 11, 2019

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Author(s): Welbeck A. Oumbouke, Alphonsine A. Koffi, Ludovic P. Ahoua Alou, Mark Rowland, Raphael N’Guessan, Silvie Huijben.

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0215074

Abstract

There is evidence from experimental hut and household studies that the entomological efficacy of long lasting pyrethroid treated nets (LLINs) is compromised in areas of pyrethroid resistance. The rapid increase in resistance intensity in African malaria vectors could further undermine the performance of these nets. The pyrethroid resistance intensity in Anopheles gambiae s.l. M’bé from central Côte d’Ivoire is reported to be high (> 1700 fold). Whether this translates into an increase in entomological indicators of malaria transmission needs investigation.

The efficacy of two long lasting insecticidal nets (LN) MiraNet and MagNet, both alpha-cypermethrin based was evaluated in experimental huts against pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae in M’bé, central Côte d’Ivoire. All nets were deliberately holed to simulate wear-and-tear and were tested unwashed and after 20 standardized washes.

The entry rates of An. gambiae s.l. into huts with insecticide treated nets were 62–84% lower than entry into huts with untreated nets (p < 0.001). Exit rates of An. gambiae s.l. with unwashed MiraNet and MagNet LNs were significantly greater than with untreated nets (50–60% vs 26%) and this effect after washing 20 times nets did not decrease. Blood-feeding with both nets was significantly inhibited relative to the untreated reference net (31–55%) (p < 0.001). Washing MiraNet LN 20 times had no significant impact on protection against An. gambiae s.l. bites but it did cause a significant fall by 40% in protection with MagNet LN (p < 0.001). All insecticide treated nets induced higher mortality of An. gambiae s.l. than the untreated net (p < 0.05). The impact though significant was limited (14–30%). The personal protection against An. gambiae s.l. bites derived from all treatments was high (75–90%). The overall insecticidal effect was compromised by pyrethroid resistance and was not detectable in some treatments. In this area of high pyrethroid resistance intensity (over 1700 fold), both MiraNet and MagNet LNs still conferred appreciable personal protection against mosquito bites despite inducing only slightly greater mortality of pyrethroid resistant Anopheles mosquitoes than untreated nets. The impact is comparable to moderately intense Benin resistance area (207 fold) and Burkina Faso (over 1000 fold). This preserved level of protection plus the small but sensitive killing of mosquitoes may continue to impact vectorial capacity despite high intensity of resistance. Nevertheless, there is an obvious need for strategies and nets with novel mode of action to enhance vector control.

Partial Text

Insecticide treated mosquito nets and indoor residual spraying of insecticide remain the cornerstones of public health strategies for preventing malaria. These core vector control methods have contributed to the decline in malaria burden, accounting for over three-quarters of the 663 million clinical cases of malaria averted over the past 15 years in Sub-Saharan Africa [1]. Long Lasting Insecticidal Nets (LLINs) made the major contribution due to the increased ownership and use of these nets in malaria endemic areas. The estimated proportion of households in areas at risk with at least one LLIN has increased from only 2% in 2000 to 79% in 2015 [2]. Control measures based on house spraying, on the other hand, have declined in coverage. The high cost of alternative non-pyrethroid chemicals might explain the recent decline in IRS coverage from 5 to just 3% [2]. While a range of insecticides is available for use in IRS, although effectively limited by cost, there is a few classes of insecticides (pyrethroids and pyrrole) and recently an insect growth inhibitor (pyriproxyfen) approved for net treatment [3–5]. Resistance to pyrethroids is now widespread in major malaria vectors [6], thus threatening the continued effectiveness of pyrethroid-based interventions. While a resistance mitigating plan has been developed [7], options are presently limited but momentum for the development of new classes of chemistry is growing and new products may become available in the near future [8].

The present study was designed to investigate in experimental huts the performance of two pyrethroid LNs (MiraNet and MagNet) against An. gambiae s.l. in an area of high resistance intensity to deltamethrin (over 1700-fold resistance) in Bouaké, Côte d’Ivoire. We observed appreciable levels of protection against mosquito bites (blood feeding inhibition) in the order of 31–55% despite high resistance intensity. These are within the protection range seen in Burkina Faso (15–25%) [27] with comparable resistance strength and in areas of lower intensity in Benin (47–57%) [15].

Despite high resistance intensity (over 1700 fold) found in M’bé, both MiraNet and MagNet LNs still confer appreciable protection against mosquito bites and induce slightly greater mortality of pyrethroid resistant Anopheles mosquitoes than untreated nets. The impact is comparable to moderately intense Benin resistance area (207 fold) and Burkina Faso (over 1000 fold). The significant level of protection that holed nets continue to offer plus the small but sensitive killing of pyrethroid resistant anopheline population would suggest that LLINs may still reduce malaria transmission despite high intensity of resistance. However, the data suggests that the community protection arising from the overall insecticidal effect of LLINs could be compromised in this area of Côte d’Ivoire with high vector resistance. There is an urgent need for development of novel strategies or LLIN with novel mode of action to enhance vector control.

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0215074

 

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