Research Article: Herbal Use among Presurgical Patients in Turkey: A Cross-Sectional Study

Date Published: April 10, 2018

Publisher: Hindawi

Author(s): Fulya Yilmaz, Hazal Ezgi Çifci.

http://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1643607

Abstract

For centuries before the advent of modern medicine, traditional medicinal plants were the major agents for primary health care. Their use declined in most developed western countries during the last century’s industrialization and urbanization. But, the last two decades have witnessed a new resurgence of interest in herbal and alternative medicines.

The survey was conducted at the Anaesthesiology and Reanimation Department of Training and Research Hospital of Health and Science University among patients who had undergone elective surgery between January 1st 2016 and April 1st 2016. A questionnaire composed of 15 questions was used.

A total 87 (14.5%) patients reported the use of herbal medications. Twenty five patients were taking a single herbal medication and 52 patients were taking more than one. 92.5% of patients do not know the side effects of herbal medications. 35 cases of operation patients were questioned by the physician about herbal use, and 228 cases were not questioned by the physician.

Anesthesiologist should be aware of the effects of herbals on body functions and possible herbal-drug interactions to take care of such potentional perioperative complications.

Partial Text

For centuries before the advent of modern medicine, traditional medicinal plants were the major agents for primary health care [1–3]. Their use however declined in most developed western countries during the last century’s industrialization and urbanization [2]. But the last two decades have witnessed a new resurgence of interest in herbal and alternative medicines [1, 2, 4, 5]. According to the WHO, about 70% of the world population currently uses medicinal herbs as complementary or alternative medicine [2]. Previous studies reported that 14–16% of American adult population and 49.4% of Israeli population consume herbal supplements often concomitantly with medications [2].

Our prospective, cross-sectional survey was conducted at the Anaesthesiology and Reanimation Department of Training and Research Hospital of Health and Science University among patients who had undergone elective surgery between January 1, 2016, and April 1, 2016. There was no special exclusion criterion. Ethical approval was obtained from the Training and Research Hospital of Health and Science University Local Ethics Committee. Written, informed consent of the participating patients was obtained. The questionnaire included sociodemographic characteristics (age, gender, and education), what kind of herbs the patient is using, and communication between the participants and their physicians about herbal use.

During the 3-month period, 600 patients responded the questionnaire at preoperative evaluation before undergoing anaesthesia. A total of 87 (14.5%) patients reported the use of herbal medications. Twenty five patients were taking a single herbal medication, and 52 patients were taking more than one. Male patients (51 out of 337) used herbal medications more frequently than females (36 out of 263) (p > 0.05). The incidence of responders is 4% (n=24) under 18 years while 96% (n=576) over 18 years. The number of cases using herbal under 18 years is 3. This indicates that parents use herbal agents for their children. The most commonly used medications are garlic (n=19), fish oil (n=14), Swedish bitter (n=10), green tea (n=10), vitamin (n=6), sage tea (n=6), ginkgo, skrzyp polny, and sycamore leaves in order to highest to lower. Patients using herbal medications started by doctor recommendation were (1.7%), by publications (newspaper, Internet) (0.7%), by friend recommendation (1.2%), and by family members recommendation (0.2%).

According to the literature, the ratio of herbal consumption among patients varies between 4.8 and 32% [5, 10]. Our study showed that 14.5% of the presurgical patients are consuming herbal medications. This ratio is in agreement with the literature. On the other hand, patients are using these medications without the knowledge of their harmful effects and drug interactions. Also, they do not inform the anesthesiologist that they are using herbal medications preoperatively.

All anesthesiologist should be aware of the effects of herbals on body functions and possible herbal-drug interactions. They must take care of such potentional perioperative complications with HDI. Hereby, they can choose the safest anaesthetic technique for their patient in the operating room [1, 6, 11–13, 21].

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1643607

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.