Research Article: Impact of Medicaid coverage expansion under the Affordable Care Act on mammography and pap tests utilization among low-income women

Date Published: April 3, 2019

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Author(s): Abeer G. Alharbi, M. Mahmud Khan, Ronnie Horner, Heather Brandt, Cole Chapman, Eugenio Paci.

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0214886

Abstract

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) expanded the coverage of Medicaid to include entire population with income below 138% of federal poverty line. It remains unclear whether this policy change has improved access to and utilization of health care, particularly use of mammography and Pap tests among poor women.

We used a difference-in-difference (DID) design to estimate the impact of Medicaid expansion on mammography and Pap tests utilization among low-income women. Expansion states are the treatment group and non-expansion states are the control group. The years 2012–13 are the pre-expansion period and 2015–16 are the post-expansion period for the purpose of estimating the DID parameters.

The difference-in-difference estimate show that likelihood of utilizing mammograms did not change significantly among low-income women after the implementation of Medicaid expansion (DID coefficient -0.0476 with t-statistics at -1.26), Pap test decreased (coefficient -0.0615, t-statistics -2.76), and Medicaid enrollment has increased significantly among low-income women living in expansion states (coefficient 0.0889 with t-value of 3.68).

Expansion of Medicaid was associated with increased Medicaid enrollment but did not yield near-term improvement in use of mammography and Pap tests among low-income women. Factors beyond health insurance coverage may be important in determining the likelihood of obtaining these screenings. Policy makers should try to identify other barriers to cancer screenings among low-income women in the USA.

Partial Text

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among American women, and the second most common cause of death from cancer besides lung cancer [1,2]. Cervical cancer incidence rates declined by half between 1975 and 2014 due to the widespread uptake of the Pap test, but declines have slowed down in recent years [1,2]. Evidence show that women who appropriately screen for breast and cervical cancer are likely to receive more timely diagnosis and treatment [3–10] and yet, rates of mammography and Pap test screenings remained suboptimal in the United States [11]. Low-income women utilize less screenings than middle or high income women. In 2015, 54.9% of low-income women received mammography while 60% received Pap test [11]. Goals of Healthy People 2020 include increasing the proportion of women who get mammograms to 81%, and Pap tests to 93%, based on the most recent guidelines [12]. There are several possible reasons for the suboptimal screening rates, among which lack of health insurance coverage is considered an important one. There is evidence that health insurance is associated with uptake of mammogram and Pap test use [13–17].

Table 1 shows the baseline characteristics of the nonelderly low-income women living in expansion and non-expansion states. Majority of the low-income women were white in both expansion and non-expansion states, however, more black women lived in non-expansion states (37.38%) compared to expansion states (23.94%). In both treatment and control groups, majority of low-income women did not have a college degree (Table 1). In expansion and non-expansion states, majority of low-income women had public health insurance, however, more women had public health insurance in expansion states (53.22%) as compared to non-expansion states (41.67%). Majority of the low-income women lived in metropolitan areas in both treatment and control groups (Table 1). Women in treatment and control groups had a similar average age (37). Therefore, states deciding to expand Medicaid were different from the states deciding not to expand in terms of percent of low income population not white, level of coverage of public insurance program and percent of poor women living in metro areas.

The affordable care act (ACA) expanded Medicaid eligibility coverage to the entire low-income population in order to improve access and utilization among this disadvantage section of the population. In the years before the ACA, rates of mammograms and Pap tests showed declining trends among women and more so among poor women [11]. This study examined the impact of expanding health coverage through Medicaid on the rates of mammograms and Pap tests among poor women. The difference-in-difference (DID) estimates indicate that Medicaid enrollment has increased significantly among low-income women after the implementation of the Medicaid expansion (Table 2). This is a proximate measure of success of ACA in terms of providing coverage to poor women through Medicaid. Other studies also found increased Medicaid enrollment in expansion states compared to non-expansion states [37]. However, the increase in Medicaid enrollment among low-income women did not translate into increased rates of mammograms or Pap test utilization compared to poor women in non-expansion states. Other studies also found little impact of Medicaid expansion on mammography and Pap tests rates [37–39].

Our study shows that expansion of Medicaid under the ACA was associated with increased Medicaid enrollment but did not yield near-term improvements in the use of mammography and Pap tests among low-income women. Although the difference-in-differences did not show improvements in mammograms and Pap tests due to Medicaid expansion under ACA, low-income women living in expansion states used higher level of screenings than their counterparts in non-expansion states. Since Medicaid expansion did not affect these screening tests, policy makers need to examine other factors that may act as barriers in improving access and utilization. Some possible explanations for this lack of impact of the Medicaid expansion on mammograms and Pap tests are presented in the discussion section but we have no concrete evidence to conclusively say which factors have affected access to screening tests adversely in the expansion states compared to non-expansion states. It is also possible that a longer timeframe will be needed for a change to be manifested itself rather than the three-year time frame used here. Future research on provider availability and characteristics, insurance types, and geographical variations is warranted for a better understanding of the use of cancer screening procedures by the poor women in the USA.

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0214886

 

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