Research Article: Is there more room to improve? The lifespan trajectory of procedural learning and its relationship to the between- and within-group differences in average response times

Date Published: July 17, 2019

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Author(s): Dora Juhasz, Dezso Nemeth, Karolina Janacsek, Carlos Tomaz.

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0215116

Abstract

Characterizing the developmental trajectories of cognitive functions such as learning, memory and decision making across the lifespan faces fundamental challenges. Cognitive functions typically encompass several processes that can be differentially affected by age. Methodological issues also arise when comparisons are made across age groups that differ in basic performance measures, such as in average response times (RTs). Here we focus on procedural learning–a fundamental cognitive function that underlies the acquisition of cognitive, social, and motor skills–and demonstrate how disentangling subprocesses of learning and controlling for differences in average RTs can reveal different developmental trajectories across the human lifespan. Two hundred-seventy participants aged between 7 and 85 years performed a probabilistic sequence learning task that enabled us to separately measure two processes of procedural learning, namely general skill learning and statistical learning. Using raw RT measures, in between-group comparisons, we found a U-shaped trajectory with children and older adults exhibiting greater general skill learning compared to adolescents and younger adults. However, when we controlled for differences in average RTs (either by using ratio scores or focusing on a subsample of participants with similar average speed), only children (but not older adults) demonstrated superior general skill learning consistently across analyses. Testing the relationship between average RTs and general skill learning within age groups shed light on further age-related differences, suggesting that general skill learning measures are more affected by average speed in some age groups. Consistent with previous studies of learning probabilistic regularities, statistical learning showed a gradual decline across the lifespan, and learning performance seemed to be independent of average speed, regardless of the age group. Overall, our results suggest that children are superior learners in various aspects of procedural learning, including both general skill and statistical learning. Our study also highlights the importance to test, and control for, the effect of average speed on other RT measures of cognitive functions, which can fundamentally affect the interpretation of group differences in developmental, aging and clinical psychology and neuroscience studies.

Partial Text

Procedural learning is a fundamental cognitive function that facilitates efficient processing of and automatic responses to complex environmental stimuli, supporting efficient adaptation to the changing environment. Procedural learning underlies the acquisition of new cognitive, social, and motor skills [1–4]; it is therefore a critical function across the human lifespan. It is a widely held view that procedural learning is most effective in childhood; nevertheless, acquiring new skills such as learning languages or learning to use new devices and applications are also possible throughout adulthood. These lifelong learning abilities are increasingly sought out in the workplace as they contribute to economic competitiveness. Additionally, it has been shown that at least in some cases learning new skills can serve as a shield against age-related cognitive decline [5–7]. Despite the ubiquitous nature of procedural learning throughout the human lifespan, how learning is affected by age is not yet fully understood.

Our study aimed to examine age-related differences in general skill learning across the human lifespan and test the argument of whether generally slower response times are associated with greater general skill learning in different developmental stages. We employed the ASRT task, which probes procedural learning, and enables us to disentangle task-general (i.e., general skill) learning from task-specific learning of probabilistic regularities (i.e., statistical learning). A large sample of participants aged between 7 and 85 years were tested on this task. We found a U-shaped developmental trajectory of general skill learning, assessed by raw RT changes during the task, with children and older adults exhibiting greater learning than adolescents and young adults. This developmental trajectory was paralleled with a U-shaped lifespan trajectory of average RTs, lending support to the ‘more room to improve’ argument from a between-group perspective. Nevertheless, our more detailed analyses of both between-group and within-group differences suggest a more complex relationship between average speed and general skill learning across the human lifespan. Importantly, the superior general skill learning of children (particularly that of the 7-8-year-olds) was consistently demonstrated across different analysis approaches, while the older adults’ general skill learning decreased to the level of young adults when differences in average speed were controlled for. Finally, task-specific triplet learning showed a gradual decline across the lifespan, and learning performance seemed to be independent of average speed, regardless of the age group. Overall, our results suggest that children are superior learners in various aspects of procedural learning, including both task-specific and task-general processes of learning.

To summarize, children (especially the 7-8-year-olds) exhibited superior general skill learning consistently across analyses, suggesting a heightened ability to acquire new skilled behaviors in this developmental stage, which extends the ‘children better’ theoretical framework of procedural learning [14] to include both task-general and task-specific processes. Our study highlights the importance of disentangling these processes of procedural learning as they may be differentially affected by age or clinical conditions (see e.g., [8, 35, 46]) and may be differentially related to average speed. Here we presented two approaches to control for average speed differences across groups: using ratio scores and testing a subsample of participants with similar average speed. Overall, the argument that slower average speed provides ‘more room to improve’ seems to be not universally true: some age groups across the lifespan and some measures of learning (task-general but not task-specific learning) seem to be more affected by average speed. Thus, our findings highlight the importance to test, and control for, the effect of average speed on other RT measures of cognitive functions, which can fundamentally affect the interpretation of group differences in developmental, aging and clinical psychology and neuroscience studies.

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0215116

 

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