Research Article: Metabolic costs of activities of daily living in persons with a lower limb amputation: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Date Published: March 20, 2019

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Author(s): Loeke van Schaik, Jan H. B. Geertzen, Pieter U. Dijkstra, Rienk Dekker, Alena Grabowski.

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0213256

Abstract

To systematically review the literature on the metabolic costs of activities of daily living (ADL) in persons with a lower limb amputation (LLA).

A literature search was undertaken in the Pubmed, Embase, CINAHL, CENTRAL, and PsycINFO databases using keywords and synonyms for LLA, metabolic costs, and ADL. The last search was performed on November 29th, 2017.

Studies were included if they met the following 2 criteria: participants were adults with a (unilateral or bilateral) LLA and metabolic costs were measured while participants performed a physical activity or ADL.

Data of 1,912 participants from 61 studies were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis. The studies used different terms to describe metabolic costs. Participants were recruited in different settings, relatively healthy, with few comorbidities. Limited data were available on metabolic costs of other activities than walking with a prosthesis. A linear mixed model analysis was performed based on the means reported, with study as unit of analysis and test results of different groups and measurement conditions as repeated measures within the unit of analysis. Predictors entered in the analysis were e.g. level and reason of amputation, age, weight, and height. During walking, oxygen consumption (ml O2/kg/min) and heart rate (beats/min) increased with a higher walking speed and a more proximal amputation. Additionally, oxygen consumption was determined by the interaction terms walking speed x amputation level and walking speed squared. Heart rate was determined by the interaction term walking speed squared.

During walking, oxygen consumption (ml O2/kg/min) and heart rate (beats/min) increased with a higher walking speed and a more proximal amputation. Data on metabolic costs of other activities were limited. The poor quality of the studies and the relatively healthy participants limited generalizability of the results of the meta-analysis.

Partial Text

In rehabilitation medicine, the main goals for persons with a lower limb amputation (LLA) are walking with a prosthesis and regaining functional capacity with regard to activities of daily living (ADL) [1–3]. To be able to achieve these goals, certain levels of physical and aerobic capacity are required [4,5].

The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) was used for conducting this systematic review and meta-analysis [22].

Sixty-one studies (reporting on 1,912 participants) were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. A linear mixed model was used to analyse the data. It was found that reported mean oxygen consumption (ml O2/kg/min) was influenced by amputation level, walking speed, and the interaction terms walking speed squared and walking speed x amputation level. Multiple previous studies reported that higher metabolic costs are associated with a more proximal level of amputation [4,5,13,82]. Previous studies also found that participants with a LLA adapt their self-selected walking speed (SSWS) in order to compensate for the higher metabolic costs [4,19,43,58]. The extent to which the SSWS is reduced depends on level of amputation [4,19,58]. The effect of walking speed on metabolic costs is also found in our analysis (Fig 2). In the multilevel analysis an increase in oxygen consumption was found at higher walking speeds, with a significant difference between reported means for controls and participants with a transfemoral amputation. However, there was no significant difference between reported means for controls and participants with a transtibial amputation. This lack of difference can be due to the included studies. For example, one study [70] measured the oxygen consumption in participants with a traumatic transtibial amputation and controls at walking speeds up to >100 m/min (Fig 2). Compared with the controls, the oxygen consumption of the participants at the highest walking speed was not significantly different (19.1±2.3 ml O2/kg/min vs. 18.9±1.8 ml O2/kg/min). In the multilevel analysis an interaction effect between walking speed squared and group was found, indicating that the effect of walking speed squared was not the same for groups. This interaction effect can be related to amputation level, but also to differences between studies including differences in methodology i.e. measurement procedures, general health, body weight, height, physical condition, and or age of the participants. However source studies report too inconsistently to be able to include these confounders in the regression analyses. The curve is based on the regression coefficients of the linear mixed model analysis of the reported means in the studies. Different study designs and heterogeneity in study populations may influence the reported means and therefore the regression curve.

Further research on the metabolic costs of walking, and daily activities in persons with a LLA is relevant in order to gather data that will help with setting functional goals, optimizing individual training, and evaluating LLA-rehabilitation. Study populations and subgroups should be described with sufficient detail regarding reason for amputation, age, gender, and level of amputation to improve generalizability. The inclusion of participants with different levels of amputation in a mixed group should be avoided.

In general oxygen consumption and heart rate for persons with transtibial and transfemoral amputation while walking are higher than for controls. A higher walking speed is associated with a higher oxygen consumption and this increase was stronger for persons with a transfemoral amputation compared to controls. Source studies report inconsistently, therefore it is not possible to include other possible confounders in the analyses such as age and cause of amputation.

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0213256

 

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