Research Article: Multi-driver and multi-scale assessment of vine community structure and composition across a complex tropical environmental matrix

Date Published: May 10, 2019

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Author(s): Diana L. Delgado, Carla Restrepo, Kai K. Yue.

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0215274

Abstract

Ecological communities are structured by multiple processes operating at multiple scales yet understanding the scale-dependency of these processes remains an open challenge. This might be particularly true for parasites, for which biotic rather than abiotic processes may play a primary role in structuring communities. Focusing on vines, a group of structural parasites that gain access to the canopy using different climbing mechanisms, we examined the influence of abiotic factors in tandem with host-parasite and parasite-parasite interactions in the assembly of tropical vine communities. Two synthetic variables, namely Climate1 and landscape Variety, were consistently important in explaining variation in species richness and diversity, as well as species composition, but their importance varied with scale. Whereas Climate1 summarizes the largest variability among climatic variables, landscape Variety expresses landscape heterogeneity within a neighborhood. Significant patterns of species co-occurrences suggest that vine-vine interactions also contribute to vine community assembly. Our results may be critical to understand vine proliferation and help design management strategies for their control.

Partial Text

Ecological communities are structured by abiotic and biotic processes operating at multiple scales [1], yet understanding their scale-dependency remains an open challenge [2, 3]. It is generally acknowledged that these processes operate in a hierarchical fashion to determine species’ distributions and ultimately, the structure of ecological communities (e.g., [4, 5], but see [6]). One group of species for which this hierarchy of processes may not apply includes a broad spectrum of symbionts—ranging from mutualistic to parasitic species [7, 8]. Among parasites, biotic processes such as host-parasite interactions may be more important than abiotic processes in determining the structure of parasite communities [7–9]. Albeit less studied, parasite-parasite interactions may play a similar role [7, 10]. To date, however, few studies have examined the role of abiotic factors in tandem with host-parasite and parasite-parasite interactions in community assembly [11, 12].

A total of 49 vine species were recorded in the 51 patches sampled. Seventeen (35%) species belong to the Fabaceae, eight (16%) to the Convolvulaceae, four (8%) to the Cucurbitaceae, and the remaining 20 species belong to 13 other families (Table C in S1 File). A classification of vine species by climbing mechanism revealed that 35 species (71%) were twiners, nine (18%) used tendrils, and the remaining five (11%) used aerial roots, a scandent or sarmentous mode of climbing. Similarly, a classification by geographic origin showed that 29 species (59%) were native and 20 (41%) were alien.

Focusing on vine communities, we asked three questions aimed at understanding patterns of alpha and beta diversity as a function of abiotic and biotic variables and scale, as well as patterns of vine co-occurrences, in a region underlain by complex environmental gradients. One abiotic (Climate1-summarizes the largest variability among temperature and precipitation variables) and one biotic (landscape Variety -. expresses landscape heterogeneity within a neighborhood) variable were consistently important in explaining variation in species richness and diversity at small and medium scales, and species composition at medium scales. In contrast, only abiotic variables were important in explaining variation in species richness, diversity, and composition at large scales. Significant patterns of co-occurrences, some positive and some negative, suggest that interactions among parasites contribute to the organization of vine communities, yet the scales at which they occur are not readily identifiable by this study. Altogether, our results indicate that abiotic factors in tandem with host-parasite and parasite-parasite interactions are important in the assembly of vine communities but depending upon scale.

Both abiotic and biotic variables were important to explain vine species richness, diversity, and composition. However, the identity and importance of these variables varied with scale. Significant patterns of species co-occurrences suggest that parasite-parasites interactions contribute to the organization of vine communities, yet the scales at which they occurred cannot be identified in this study. Altogether, our results indicate that the combined effect of abiotic and biotic factors are important in the assembly of vine communities but that they are scale-dependent. The increasing vine cover in different regions around the world and their reported negative impacts on hosts has made vines a group of conservation concern. Our results may be critical to understand vine proliferation and help design management strategies for their control.

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0215274

 

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