Research Article: Occurrence of clinical mastitis in primiparous Estonian dairy cows in different housing conditions

Date Published: November 21, 2006

Publisher: BioMed Central

Author(s): Piret Kalmus, Arvo Viltrop, Birgit Aasmäe, Kalle Kask.

http://doi.org/10.1186/1751-0147-48-21

Abstract

Objectives of the study were to document the impact of some management factors on the occurrence of clinical mastitis in primiparous dairy cows and to identify common udder pathogens of clinical mastitis in freshly calved heifers and multiparous cows on the day of calving.

A one-year study was conducted during 2004 and 2005 in 11 selected Estonian dairy herds. Data consisted of 68 heifers with clinical mastitis and 995 heifers without clinical mastitis on the day of calving. Multivariable logistic regression with a random herd effect was used to investigate any association between housing system or the time interval from movement of heifers to the calving facility and day of calving on occurrence of clinical mastitis. Milk samples for bacteriological analysis were collected from affected heifers and multiparous cows on the day of calving

Clinical mastitis occurrence in the study population of freshly calved heifers equalled 6.1 %. Housing system was not a significant risk factor for clinical mastitis of freshly calved heifers.

Moving heifers to the calving facilities too late in tiestall farms increased risk for clinical mastitis at parturition. The isolated udder pathogens did not differ significantly in tiestall farms compared to freestall farms in heifers, but differences were found between heifers and multiparous cows at parturition.

Partial Text

Mastitis is an economically important disease for dairy cattle production worldwide. Although replacement heifers are generally expected to have good udder health, many studies have identified a high risk of their developing subclinical mastitis during early lactation and reported that the prevalence of intramammary infections (IMI) is high in the peripartum period [1-7], mainly depending on infectious species [8]. At the same time, published reports on clinical mastitis incidence in freshly calved heifers are scarce and controversial. A nested case-control study in Norway showed that 5 % (6,410 out of 128,027) cases of clinical mastitis was treated in first calving heifers [9]. In Finland, the frequency of treatments for heifer mastitis from one week before to one week after calving was 3.9% for Ayrshires and 5.6% for Frisians [10]. In a study conducted in Netherlands the rate of clinical mastitis around parturition was found to be higher in heifers (>30%) compared to older cows (13%) [11].

Approximately 40% (423) of the first-calving heifers were in tiestall farms and approximately 60% (640) were in freestall farms. The overall occurrence of clinical mastitis at calving of the heifers was 6.4% (n = 68), being 9.7% (n = 41) in tiestall farms compared with 4.1 % (n = 27) in freestall farms. The range of days from moving heifers to the calving facility and expected parturition were from 0 to76, where the median day was 26. The results of logistic regression analysis are shown in Table 2. Housing system only was not a significant risk factor for clinical mastitis of freshly calved heifers. In tiestall farms heifers moved to the calving facility less than two weeks before expected parturition had a higher risk (OR = 5.9 p = 0.001) to develop clinical mastitis at calving than heifers moved more than 14 days before calving.

In 11 large herds using traditional Estonian dairy management, two housing systems did not differ significantly in clinical mastitis occurrence of first-calving heifers. Others, however, have reported higher incidence of clinical mastitis in tiestall than in freestall housing [21,28-30]. In tiestall farms, the main risk factors for clinical mastitis are teat injuries, short stalls and shortage of bedding material [31,32], especially during the periparturient period [33]. In one Swedish report, the incidence of clinical mastitis decreased across 18 months, after the management system was changed from the tiestall to the freestall system [34]. We did identify an association at the tie-stall farms between time of movement of close-to-term heifers to the milking farm and the occurrence of clinical mastitis. Stress and sudden changes in environmental and management conditions during the peripartum period could weaken natural defence mechanisms in animals, making them more susceptible to clinical mastitis. In tiestall systems, an increased frequency of lying down and rising may lead to increased risk of teat tramping, leading to increased clinical mastitis incidence [35]. Contrarily, in loose-housing systems, cows have sufficient space for lying down and standing up in a more natural way during parturition. The results of the present study reflect the situation in large commercial dairy herds in Estonia. However, the number of herds in the study was limited and because sample sizes were small in some herds, these results should be interpreted with caution. A larger study of longer duration and with more herds is needed for more reliable conclusions.

Moving heifers to the calving fascilities too late in tiestall farms, increased risk for clinical mastitis at parturition. The isolated udder pathogens did not differ significantly in tiestall farms compared to freestall farms in heifers, but differences were found between heifers and multiparous cows at parturition.

The author(s) declare that they have no competing interests.

PK carried out the study, compiled the results and drafted the manuscript. AV participated in the designing the study and analysis of the data. BA coordinated data collection, and KK coordinated the study. All authors were significantly involved in designing the study, intepreting of data and composing the manuscript.

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1186/1751-0147-48-21

 

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