Research Article: Physical examination skills training: Faculty staff vs. patient instructor feedback—A controlled trial

Date Published: July 10, 2017

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Author(s): Markus Krautter, Katja Diefenbacher, Jobst-Hendrik Schultz, Imad Maatouk, Anne Herrmann-Werner, Nadja Koehl-Hackert, Wolfgang Herzog, Christoph Nikendei, Joerg Latus.

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0180308

Abstract

Standardized patients are widely used in training of medical students, both in teaching and assessment. They also frequently lead complete training sessions delivering physical examination skills without the aid of faculty teaching staff–acting as “patient instructors” (PIs). An important part of this training is their ability to provide detailed structured feedback to students which has a strong impact on their learning success. Yet, to date no study has assessed the quality of physical examination related feedback by PIs. Therefore, we conducted a randomized controlled study comparing feedback of PIs and faculty staff following a physical examination assessed by students and video assessors.

14 PIs and 14 different faculty staff physicians both delivered feedback to 40 medical students that had performed a physical examination on the respective PI while the physicians observed the performance. The physical examination was rated by two independent video assessors to provide an objective performance standard (gold standard). Feedback of PI and physicians was content analyzed by two different independent video assessors based on a provided checklist and compared to the performance standard. Feedback of PIs and physicians was also rated by medical students and video assessors using a questionnaire consisting of 12 items.

There was no statistical significant difference concerning overall matching of physician or PI feedback with gold standard ratings by video assessment (p = .219). There was also no statistical difference when focusing only on items that were classified as major key steps (p = .802), mistakes or parts that were left out during physical examination (p = .219) or mistakes in communication items (p = .517). The feedback of physicians was significantly better rated than PI feedback both by students (p = .043) as well as by video assessors (p = .034).

In summary, our study demonstrates that trained PIs are able to provide feedback of equal quantitative value to that of faculty staff physicians with regard to a physical examination performed on them. However, both the students and the video raters judged the quality of the feedback given by the physicians to be significantly better than that of the PIs.

Partial Text

The physical examination of a patient is an essential clinical competence of physicians, and along with comprehensive history taking, flags the beginning of primary patient-doctor relationships. Moreover, history taking and physical examination form the basis for establishing a diagnosis, planning further diagnostic steps, and developing a therapeutic scheme for the patient’s care. Accordingly, the acquisition of physical examination skills constitutes a centerpiece of medical education [1]. However, several studies indicate severe shortcomings in students’ physical examination competencies [2,3]. In a recent study, we revealed significant deficits in the ability of final-year medical students to perform a detailed physical examination of standardized patients [4], with only 63% of correctly performed procedural steps. However, the manner in which physical examination skills should be delivered is still subject to discussion [5–7].

The present study prospectively examined whether feedback provided by specially trained PIs regarding a physical examination carried out on them is comparable with feedback provided by faculty staff physicians observing the examination. To this aim, both the examination procedure conducted by the student and the feedback from the PI and the physician were video-recorded. In a first step, the examination was evaluated by video raters using binary checklists, which subsequently served as gold standard. The feedback was then compared with this checklist in order to quantify the points mentioned in the feedback. Overall, both the physician feedback and the PI feedback contained only a small percentage of the possible items (between 11 and 34%). In terms of matching with the gold standard, no significant difference in performance was found between PIs and physicians. As the 147-item checklist is very comprehensive, it is understandably not possible to list all of these points individually in one feedback session. Therefore, an examination of the pure mistakes, the key steps and the communicative aspects was conducted. Again, no significant differences emerged between the PI and physician feedback on any of these points.

Several limitations of this study should be mentioned. First, the percentage of points that received feedback is relatively low compared to the gold standard. This does, however, reflect everyday life, in which feedback must be limited to the points that appear to be most important, and it is almost never possible to provide comprehensive feedback. Although our PIs had completed extensive training, these were their first “real” assignments as a PI who is examined and provides feedback directly afterwards, while the physicians already had several years of experience both in physical examination and in teaching itself. Therefore, it may be the case that with the experience that the PIs will gather over time, the results will improve further. Although the sample size of the present study and the number of involved PIs and physicians was rather small, we were able to collect two to three cases per physician and PI in order to minimize the between-case variance. Furthermore, the existence of a pool of 12 different PIs trained in physical examination feedback skills is rather unique.

In summary, our study demonstrates that trained PIs are able to provide feedback of equal quantitative value to that of faculty staff physicians with regard to a physical examination performed on them. However, both the students and the video raters judged the quality of the feedback given by the physicians to be significantly better than that of the PIs. This is interesting insofar as PIs are already trained in providing feedback prior to the specialization in physical examination. Thus, under considerations of personnel and financial resources, it is reasonable to deploy PIs to assess students’ physical examination skills. Further studies should investigate whether these results could be improved further by PIs who have completed longer training or who possess greater experience in the area of physical examination.

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0180308

 

0 0 vote
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments