Research Article: Postprandial lipaemia 10 and 34 hours after playing football: Does playing frequency affect the response?

Date Published: July 2, 2019

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Author(s): Darren J. Paul, George P. Nassis, Anissa C. Kerouani, Jens Bangsbo, Daniel Boullosa.

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0218043

Abstract

Elevated postprandial triglyceride (TG) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The time window for the last bout beneficial effect on postprandial lipaemia after football play is unknown. The aim of the present study was to examine whether playing affects postprandial TG during 1.5 day of reduced activity. Eighteen males were randomly allocated to perform either 1 (1FOOT; n = 9; age = 33.0 ± 5.0 yrs; body mass index = 24.2 ± 3.6 kg/m2) or 3 (3FOOT) consecutive days of 60-min 5 vs 5 football (n = 9; age = 32.8 ± 5.2 yrs; body mass index = 26.2 ± 4.1 kg/m2) matches across a 5-day study period. They arrived to the laboratory 10 hrs and 34 hrs after the final football session and blood samples were collected at fasted (0 min) and 45, 90, 240 and 360 min post a high fat load meal. There were non significant increase for postprandial TG AUC (9.1%; p = 0.17; 95%CI = -0.43 to 2.0; ES = -0.23) and iAUC (14.2%; p = 0.43; 95%CI = -0.92 to 1.9; ES = -0.24) between 10 and 34 hrs after the 1FOOT. For the 3FOOT, there was a non significant decrease in postprandial TG AUC (-2.7%; p = 0.73; 95%CI = -2.0 to 1.5; ES = 0.05) and iAUC (-17.5%; p = 0.41; 95%ci = -2.5 to 1.1; ES = 0.31) from 10 to 34 hrs, respectively. Performing three consecutive days of football exercise may offer no greater protective effect for postprandial TG before a period of reduced activity, compared to a single session.

Partial Text

Sedentary behavior is an important issue in public health [1]. Prolonged time spent sitting or reclining (i.e., TV watching, computer-related activities, driving a car, etc.) is considered an important risk factor for abnormal lipid and glucose metabolism, type 2 diabetes, and all-cause mortality, independent of moderate-and-vigorous physical activity [1] and lower levels of physical activity [2,3]. The effect of sedentary behavior on lipid metabolism is worsened when it is combined with regular consumption of high energy dense foods [4]. The increased postprandial (post fed) triglyceride (TG) response following consumption of energy dense foods has also been linked to cardiovascular disease [4]. Though closely related, postprandial measures appear to be as useful as fasted TG for risk stratification [5]. Furthermore, postprandial TGs could be particularly useful for clinical trial setting where collecting fasting blood samples can become logistically complicated, thus, postprandial samples may improve patient compliance [6].

The aim of the present study was to examine whether different frequency of playing football (1 session vs 3 sessions) affects postprandial TG during 1.5 day of reduced activity. We found no difference for postprandial TG incremental area under the curve from 10 to 34 hrs following either one single or three consecutive 60 min sessions of playing football. Our findings have important clinical implications, notably that there does not appear to be an additive effect from three consecutive days of playing football in the evening 10 and 34 hrs post the last bout of exercise, compared to solely one football session.

In conclusion there was no difference for postprandial TG incremental area under the curve from 10 to 34 hrs following either one single, or three consecutive days of playing 60 minutes of football. Performing three consecutive days of football exercise may offer no greater protective effect for postprandial TG before a period of reduced activity, compared to a single session. Two-hour insulin response increased from 10 to 34 hrs, suggesting impaired sensitivity.

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0218043

 

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