Research Article: Prediction of neuroblastoma cell response to treatment with natural or synthetic retinoids using selected protein biomarkers

Date Published: June 12, 2019

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Author(s): Viera Dobrotkova, Petr Chlapek, Marta Jezova, Katerina Adamkova, Pavel Mazanek, Jaroslav Sterba, Renata Veselska, Aamir Ahmad.

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0218269

Abstract

Although the administration of retinoids represents an important part of treatment for children suffering from high-risk neuroblastomas, approximately 50% of these patients do not respond to this therapy or develop resistance to retinoids during treatment. Our study focused on the comparative analysis of the expression of five genes and corresponding proteins (DDX39A, HMGA1, HMGA2, HOXC9 and PBX1) that have recently been discussed as possible predictive biomarkers of clinical response to retinoid differentiation therapy. Expression of these five candidate biomarkers was evaluated at both the mRNA and protein level in the same subset of 8 neuroblastoma cell lines after treatment with natural or synthetic retinoids. We found that the cell lines that were HMGA2-positive and/or HOXC9-negative have a reduced sensitivity to retinoids. Furthermore, the experiments revealed that the retinoid-sensitive cell lines showed a uniform pattern of change after treatment with both natural and sensitive retinoids: increased DDX39A and decreased PBX1 protein levels. Our results showed that in NBL cells, these putative protein biomarkers are associated with sensitivity or resistance to retinoids, and their endogenous or induced expression can distinguish between these two phenotypes.

Partial Text

Neuroblastoma (NBL) is the most common extracranial solid tumor in children, accounting for 8-10% of childhood cancers in the USA and Europe [1], with an incidence of 10.5 per million children and affecting males slightly more often than females (1.2:1.0) [2]. NBL is typically heterogeneous, with variations in clinical appearance from spontaneous regression to aggressive metastatic disease disseminating mainly to the liver, bones, brain, and skin [3]. Children suffering from high-risk NBL have a very poor prognosis, with overall survival rates of only 40% [4], even though an aggressive multimodal therapy comprising induction chemotherapy, surgery, radiotherapy, high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation, biologics and immunotherapy is administered to these patients.

Our study aimed to analyze the expression of five candidate biomarkers of sensitivity/resistance to retinoids (DDX39A, HMGA1, HMGA2, HOXC9, PBX1) in a single experimental study using a set of patient-derived and reference NBL cell lines. Our results suggest that on the mRNA level, 7 days of exposure to natural and synthetic retinoids resulted in a change in expression of 3 out of 5 analyzed genes (HMGA1, HMGA2, and PBX1), which could indicate ongoing changes towards a more differentiated phenotype mediated by retinoids. Further analysis of protein expression by Western blotting revealed that retinoids modulated the expression of the studied biomarkers at the protein level in an even more significant manner.

In summary, our study was the first to evaluate the predictive value of five selected protein biomarkers in the same set of NBL cell lines after treatment with natural or synthetic retinoids. We found that cell lines that were HMGA2-positive and/or HOXC9-negative have a reduced sensitivity to retinoids. Furthermore, our experiments revealed that the retinoid-sensitive cell lines showed a uniform pattern of change after treatment with both natural and sensitive retinoids: increased DDX39A and decreased PBX1 protein levels. Our results proved that in NBL cells, these putative protein biomarkers are clearly associated with retinoid sensitivity or resistance, and the endogenous or induced expression of these markers can distinguish between the two phenotypes.

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0218269

 

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