Research Article: Predictors for achieving adequate protein and energy intake in nursing home rehabilitation patients

Date Published: November 17, 2017

Publisher: Springer International Publishing

Author(s): J. I. van Zwienen-Pot, M. Visser, H. M. Kruizenga.

http://doi.org/10.1007/s40520-017-0850-4

Abstract

Adequate energy and protein intake could be essential for contributing significantly to the rehabilitations process. Data on the actual nutritional intake of older nursing home rehabilitation patients have not yet been investigated.

To investigate the nutritional intake and predictors for achieving protein and energy requirements on the 14th day of admission in nursing home rehabilitation patients.

Fifty-nine patients aged 65+ years newly admitted to nursing home rehabilitation wards were included. Data on potential variables were collected on admission. On the fourteenth day nutritional intake was assessed. Intake was considered ‘adequate’ if patients had achieved ≥ 1.2 g of protein/kg bodyweight and ≥ 85% of their energy needs according to Harris and Benedict + 30%. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to select predictors for adequate intake.

Protein and energy intake was assessed in 79 patients [67% female, mean age 82 ± (SD) 8 years, BMI 25 ± 6 kg/m2]. Mean energy intake was 1677 kcal (± 433) and mean protein intake was 68 g (± 20). Fourteen patients (18%) achieved an adequate protein and energy intake. Predictors for adequate intake were use of sip/tube feeding (OR = 7.7; 95% CI = 1.35–44.21), BMI (0.68; 0.53–0.87) and nausea (8.59; 1.42–52.01).

Only 18% of older nursing home rehabilitation patients had an adequate protein and energy intake at 14 days after admission. Patients with higher BMI were less likely, while those using sip/tube feeding or feeling nauseous were more likely to achieve an adequate protein and energy intake.

Partial Text

As a result of the phenomenon ‘population ageing’, the number of older adults admitted to rehabilitation wards of nursing homes has increased [1]. Rehabilitation in nursing homes is required after an accident, surgery or hospitalization when immediate return to the usual living situation is not possible. Rehabilitation in Dutch nursing homes consists of integrated multidisciplinary care for frail older adults, focusing on expected recovery of function and participation [2].

This study investigated the protein and energy intake and predictors of an adequate protein and energy intake in older patients newly admitted to rehabilitation wards in nursing homes. Only 18% had an adequate protein and energy intake on the 14th day following admission. Fewer patients achieved an adequate protein intake than an adequate energy intake. Feeling nauseous during the first week of admission was associated with an increased likelihood of adequate protein and energy intake. Patients using sip or tube feeding were also more likely to have an adequate protein and energy intake than patients not using sip or tube feeding. A higher BMI was associated with a lower likelihood of adequate protein and energy intake.

Only 18% of older nursing home rehabilitation patients had an adequate protein and energy intake on the 14th day following admission. Adequate protein intake was more difficult to achieve compared to adequate energy intake. Patients with higher BMI were less likely, while those using sip/tube feeding or experiencing nausea in the first week after admission were more likely to achieve an adequate protein and energy intake.

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1007/s40520-017-0850-4

 

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