Research Article: Six degree-of-freedom knee joint kinematics in obese individuals with knee pain during gait

Date Published: March 24, 2017

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Author(s): Jing-Sheng Li, Tsung-Yuan Tsai, David T. Felson, Guoan Li, Cara L. Lewis, John Leicester Williams.

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0174663

Abstract

Knee joint pain is a common symptom in obese individuals and walking is often prescribed as part of management programs. Past studies in obese individuals have focused on standing alignment and kinematics in the sagittal and coronal planes. Investigation of 6 degree-of-freedom (6DOF) knee joint kinematics during standing and gait is important to thoroughly understand knee function in obese individuals with knee pain. This study aimed to investigate the 6DOF knee joint kinematics in standing and during gait in obese patients using a validated fluoroscopic imaging system. Ten individuals with obesity and knee pain were recruited. While standing, the knee was in 7.4±6.3°of hyperextension, 2.8±3.3° of abduction and 5.6±7.3° of external rotation. The femoral center was located 0.7±3.1mm anterior and 5.1±1.5mm medial to the tibial center. During treadmill gait, the sagittal plane motion, i.e., flexion/extension and anterior-posterior translation, showed a clear pattern. Specifically, obese individuals with knee pain maintained the knee in more flexion and more anterior tibial translation during most of the stance phase of the gait cycle and had a reduced total range of knee flexion when compared to a healthy non-obese group. In conclusion, obese individuals with knee pain used hyperextension knee posture while standing, but maintained the knee in more flexion during gait with reduced overall range of motion in the 6DOF analysis.

Partial Text

The prevalence of obesity is increasing in the United States and throughout the world [1, 2]. In 2011–2012, 34.9% of adults in the United States were obese [3]. Musculoskeletal disorders are commonly seen in obese individuals and one of the most common and disabling of these is knee osteoarthritis (OA) [4].

This study investigated individuals with obesity and knee pain in standing and during gait under DFIS surveillance. While standing, the knee was in about 7.4° hyperextension, slight abduction (valgus), and about 5.6° of external rotation. During treadmill gait, the largest rotational excursion was in flexion-extension and the largest translational excursion was in the anterior-posterior direction, while motions in the other planes were smaller.

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0174663

 

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