Research Article: The Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry: clinical outcome and short-term survival of 2,137 primary shoulder replacements

Date Published: April 24, 2012

Publisher: Informa Healthcare

Author(s): Jeppe V Rasmussen, John Jakobsen, Stig Brorson, Bo S Olsen.

http://doi.org/10.3109/17453674.2012.665327

Abstract

The Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry (DSR) was established in 2004. Data are reported electronically by the surgeons. Patient-reported outcome is collected 10–14 months postoperatively using the Western Ontario osteoarthritis of the shoulder index (WOOS). 2,137 primary shoulder arthroplasties (70% women) were reported to the registry between January 2006 and December 2008. Mean age at surgery was 69 years (SD 12). The most common indications were a displaced proximal humeral fracture (54%) or osteoarthritis (30%). 61% were stemmed hemiarthroplasties, 28% resurfacing hemiarthroplasties, 8% reverse shoulder arthroplasties, and 3% total arthroplasties. Median WOOS was 59% (IQR: 37–82). 5% had been revised by the end of June 2010. The most frequent indications for revision were dislocation or glenoid attrition.

Partial Text

DSR was established in January 2004. At the start, the reporting of information was voluntary but in 2006 the National Board of Health made reporting mandatory. Negligence can result in loss of license to perform shoulder arthroplasty. The registry is located at the Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus; it is financed by the Danish counties and has no dependency on commercial parties.

2,137 primary shoulder arthroplasties (70% women) were reported to the registry between January 2006 and December 2008. 54 patients had bilateral replacements (with each replacement being considered a separate case). Mean age at surgery was 69 years (SD 12). Compared to the NPR, the DSR had received reports on 88% of the operated patients.

Compared to the Norwegian and the Swedish registries, rheumatoid arthritis was a rare diagnosis in the Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry (Fevang et al. 2009, Rahme et al. 2001). Since our data were collected more recently, one possible explanation of the different findings might be the reduced need for surgical treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis due to improvements in the medical treatment (Fevang et al. 2007).

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.3109/17453674.2012.665327