Research Article: The quantity of food waste in the garbage stream of southern Ontario, Canada households

Date Published: June 13, 2018

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Author(s): Paul van der Werf, Jamie A. Seabrook, Jason A. Gilliland, Judi Hewitt.

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0198470

Abstract

There is little consensus on the amount of worldwide food waste generation because many current estimates are indirect and link back to the same limited primary datasets, with much of the data originating from fieldwork undertaken in the 1970s and 1980s. Direct measurement of waste streams, through waste composition studies, can be used to develop accurate estimates of food waste disposal. In Ontario, Canada, municipalities that undertake household waste composition studies all use a common direct measurement methodology that includes a broad range of waste categories, including food waste. The purpose of this research was to estimate the quantity of food waste disposed, in the garbage stream, by households in southern Ontario, Canada, and determine if this common methodology could be expanded and serve as the basis of a standardized and rigorous household food waste measurement methodology. Household waste composition study data (2012–2015), including a single “food waste” category, were gathered from 9 Ontario municipalities, aggregated and analyzed to develop estimates of food waste in the garbage stream. On average, households disposed 2.40 kg/week of food waste in the garbage, which comprised 35.4% of this waste stream. This does not include any food waste otherwise disposed (e.g., sink) or recycled (e.g., composted). Urban households disposed significantly greater amounts of food waste compared to rural households in the spring (p = 0.01) and summer (p = 0.02). Households with access to a green bin program disposed significantly less food waste than those with no access to a green bin program in the spring (p = 0.03) and summer (p<0.01). The common methodology used to develop these estimates shows promise as the basis of a household food waste measurement methodology. This future methodology would include dividing food waste into avoidable and unavoidable food waste categories, as well as adding subcategories (e.g., avoidable fruits and vegetables).

Partial Text

Given humanity’s biological nature, the procurement, preparation, eating and wasting of food has been a constant feature of our history. This wasting of food represents lost utility and ultimately, inefficiency. It is ironic, however, that food waste and food insecurity co-exist. On the one hand, Gustavsson et al. [1] estimates that one-third and Parfitt et al. [2] up to one-half of annual food production is wasted, while on the other hand up to 795 million people are undernourished globally, including 15 million in developed regions [3]. Reducing the amount of food that becomes waste can help ameliorate this social issue, as well as presenting opportunities to reduce its monetary (e.g., wasting money) and environmental (e.g., greenhouse gas generation) impacts.

Fig 1 depicts the average waste composition from the 28, two-week single-family household waste composition studies. On average, 35.4% of the disposal (i.e., garbage) stream consisted of food waste (range 27.2%-45.6%). The mean food waste disposal of these households was 2.40 kg/household/week (SD = 1.07) or 124.80 kg/household/year (Table 1). This does not include food waste otherwise disposed (e.g., sink) or recycled (e.g., composted). The range per municipality (n = 9) was 1.78–3.10 kg/ household /week and per waste composition study (n = 28) was 1.41–3.31 kg/ household /week. Furthermore, the per sampling area (n = 85) range was 0.00–4.04 kg/ household /week, with the low part of this range coming from sampling areas with seasonal populations (e.g., summer cottage residents). Variability is based on a neighbourhood basis, but not on a household basis.

This study developed an estimate of the amount of food waste disposed, in the garbage stream, by southern Ontario single-family households using a common methodology, and assessed whether this methodology could be adapted and expanded to directly measure household food waste.

Based on available waste composition study data, households in nine southern Ontario municipalities dispose, on average, 2.4kg/ household /week of food waste in the garbage stream. The common methodology used to develop these estimates shows promise as the basis of a household food waste measurement methodology. Expanding this methodology to encompass greater disposal and composition detail can be used to produce more accurate municipal, regional and possibly country-wide household food waste estimates that can be used to develop sound food waste reduction policy and interventions.

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0198470

 

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