Research Article: The Relevance of Emotional Intelligence in Personnel Selection for High Emotional Labor Jobs

Date Published: April 28, 2016

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Author(s): Sarah Herpertz, Sophia Nizielski, Michael Hock, Astrid Schütz, Jakob Pietschnig.

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0154432

Abstract

Although a large number of studies have pointed to the potential of emotional intelligence (EI) in the context of personnel selection, research in real-life selection contexts is still scarce. The aim of the present study was to examine whether EI would predict Assessment Center (AC) ratings of job-relevant competencies in a sample of applicants for the position of a flight attendant. Applicants’ ability to regulate emotions predicted performance in group exercises. However, there were inconsistent effects of applicants’ ability to understand emotions: Whereas the ability to understand emotions had a positive effect on performance in interview and role play, the effect on performance in group exercises was negative. We suppose that the effect depends on task type and conclude that tests of emotional abilities should be used judiciously in personnel selection procedures.

Partial Text

Although the importance of measuring applicants’ emotional intelligence (EI) in the context of personnel selection is widely acknowledged [1], research is still relatively scarce. To address this gap, the present study assessed applicants’ EI in a real-life selection setting and examined whether facets of EI are related to Assessment Center (AC) ratings of job-relevant competencies.

The central aim of our study was to examine whether emotionally intelligent applicants would be more likely to meet the demands of a job requiring high emotional labor than their competitors. Thus, we examined whether emotionally intelligent applicants would receive higher AC ratings than their less emotionally intelligent counterparts. We found a positive effect of the ability to understand emotions on interview and role play performance and a positive effect of the ability to regulate emotions on group exercise performance. These findings were expected and indicate that the ability to perceive and regulate emotions helps persons to deal with demanding situations in the AC. An interesting but unexpected finding was the negative effect of the ability to understand emotions on group exercise performance.

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0154432