Research Article: The role of weather conditions on running performance in the Boston Marathon from 1972 to 2018

Date Published: March 8, 2019

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Author(s): Beat Knechtle, Stefania Di Gangi, Christoph Alexander Rüst, Elias Villiger, Thomas Rosemann, Pantelis Theo Nikolaidis, Laurent Mourot.

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0212797

Abstract

This study examined the relationship of weather conditions, together with sex and country of origin, with running performance in the Boston Marathon from 1972 to 2018. A total of 580,990 observations from 382,209 different finishers were analyzed using Generalized Additive Mixed Models. Different groups and subgroups were considered such as all runners, near elite 101:200 finishers, near elite 21:100, annual top ten finishers and annual winners. Weather conditions, over the hours of the event, were average air temperature (°C), total precipitations (mm), wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) (°C), wind speed (km/h), wind direction (head wind, side wind, tail wind) and barometric pressure (hPa). These effects were examined in a multi-variable model, together with: sex, country of origin, calendar year, an interaction term country:sex and a spline smooth term in function of calendar year and sex. The average temperature, when increasing by 1°C, was related to worsened performance (by 00:01:47 h:min:sec for all finishers and by 00:00:20 h:min:sec for annual winners). Also, the pressure and wet-bulb globe temperature, when increasing, were related to worsened performances. Tail wind improved performances of all groups. Increasing precipitation was significantly (p<0.05) related to worsened performances in all groups except annual winners. Increasing wind speed was also related to worsened performances in all finishers and near elite groups. Kenyans and Ethiopians were the fastest nationalities. The sex differences (men faster than women in all groups) were the largest in near elite groups. Our findings contributed to the knowledge of the performance in Boston Marathon across calendar years, considering as main effects weather conditions, country of origin and sex.

Partial Text

To date, the influence of different environmental conditions such as ambient air temperature wind, precipitations, barometric pressure, humidity, dew point, cloud cover, solar irradiation and atmospheric pollutants have been investigated in marathon running performance [1–7]. It is well-known that environmental conditions have an influence on marathon running performance [8–10] where unfavorable weather conditions such as high ambient temperatures impair performance [4] in both slow [1,5] and fast marathoners [2]. Moreover, performance is more negatively affected by environmental conditions for slow runners [3]. The influence of environmental conditions such as air temperature has been investigated in different marathon races for different performance levels such as top three runners, top ten runners, elite to sub-elite runners or all finishers [1,2,7,11]. However, influences on environmental conditions have been mainly investigated only for limited time periods [1–3], whereas no study has covered a period of longer than 36 years.

Between 1972 and 2018, a total of 580,990 observations from 382,209 different finishers were recorded in the race results. Therefore we had many observations per runner.

The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of weather conditions, together with sex and country, on performance in the Boston Marathon from 1972 to 2018. Different groups and subgroups of performance level were considered such as all runners, near elite 101:200 finishers, near elite 21:100, annual top ten finishers and annual winners. The main findings were (i) an increase of average temperature by 1 °C was related to worsened performance with greater effect for all finishers, (ii) increasing barometric pressure was related to worsened performances, (iii) wet-bulb globe temperature, analogously, when increasing was related to worsened performances, (iv) tail wind was related to improved performances of all groups, (v) precipitations, when increasing, were related to worsened performances, (vi) increasing wind speed was also related to worsened performances for all finishers and near elite groups.

For both female and male runners competing in Boston marathon between 1972 and 2018, an increase of average temperature by 1 °C and increasing barometric pressure were related to worsened performances with greater effect for all finishers, increasing wet-bulb globe temperature was related to worsened performances of all groups except winners, tail wind was related to improved performances of all groups, increasing wind speed was also related to worsened performances, but not for elite groups, and increasing precipitations worsened performances. Considering the selected groups of runners, weather conditions effects had less impact than country of origin and sex. Country and sex effects, compared to the weather conditions effects, seemed to be more subjected to the selection criteria as their estimates varied between the performance groups more than the weather conditions estimates. Future studies need to confirm these findings in other large city marathons such as the New York City Marathon.

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0212797

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.