Research Article: Thermal Carrying Capacity for a Thermally-Sensitive Species at the Warmest Edge of Its Range

Date Published: November 25, 2013

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Author(s): Daniel Ayllón, Graciela G. Nicola, Benigno Elvira, Irene Parra, Ana Almodóvar, David L. Roberts.

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0081354

Abstract

Anthropogenic environmental change is causing unprecedented rates of population extirpation and altering the setting of range limits for many species. Significant population declines may occur however before any reduction in range is observed. Determining and modelling the factors driving population size and trends is consequently critical to predict trajectories of change and future extinction risk. We tracked during 12 years 51 populations of a cold-water fish species (brown trout Salmo trutta) living along a temperature gradient at the warmest thermal edge of its range. We developed a carrying capacity model in which maximum population size is limited by physical habitat conditions and regulated through territoriality. We first tested whether population numbers were driven by carrying capacity dynamics and then targeted on establishing (1) the temperature thresholds beyond which population numbers switch from being physical habitat- to temperature-limited; and (2) the rate at which carrying capacity declines with temperature within limiting thermal ranges. Carrying capacity along with emergent density-dependent responses explained up to 76% of spatio-temporal density variability of juveniles and adults but only 50% of young-of-the-year’s. By contrast, young-of-the-year trout were highly sensitive to thermal conditions, their performance declining with temperature at a higher rate than older life stages, and disruptions being triggered at lower temperature thresholds. Results suggest that limiting temperature effects were progressively stronger with increasing anthropogenic disturbance. There was however a critical threshold, matching the incipient thermal limit for survival, beyond which realized density was always below potential numbers irrespective of disturbance intensity. We additionally found a lower threshold, matching the thermal limit for feeding, beyond which even unaltered populations declined. We predict that most of our study populations may become extinct by 2100, depicting the gloomy fate of thermally-sensitive species occurring at thermal range margins under limited potential for adaptation and dispersal.

Partial Text

Natural and anthropogenic disturbances are impacting global ecological systems and causing elevated rates of population extirpation, so that there is increasing concern that the rate of environmental change may exceed the capacity of populations to persist and maintain their range [1]. A population’s extinction risk, persistence time and duration of its final decline to extinction, as well as the probability of evolutionary rescue, strongly depend on initial numbers and population size variability [2]–[4]. In many systems, imminent extinction will be signalled early by a decreasing rate of recovery from small perturbations. This critical slowing down is typically characterized by an increase in variance or autocorrelation of fluctuations of the system as a tipping point is approached [5]–[6]. In highly stochastic systems, critical transitions will on the contrary happen far from local tipping points and an increasing variability will reflect the shift to a contrasting regime [7]. Improving wildlife’s conservation and management requires therefore a deep comprehension of not only spatial patterns in local species abundance but also the way and rate a population’s size changes through time – its trajectory. Since dynamics are driven by the interplay of density-dependent and density-independent aspects of the environment, determining how the strength of density dependence varies with environmental variance remains critical for predicting near-term population trajectories [8]–[9]; the heart of the matter is then, what limits and regulates the size of natural populations in a fluctuating world?

Recent human-induced species’ extinction rates are overwhelmingly greater than at any other time in human history [46] and number of species at the verge of imminent extinction is also increasing at an unparalleled speed [47]; meanwhile, current rates of population extirpation are at least three orders of magnitude higher than species extinction rates [48]. This latter is made evident by the fact that species are shifting their ranges two or three times faster than previously reported [20], especially freshwater fish, which may be responding to global warming at higher rates than terrestrial organism [49]. However, significant population declines of species of high conservation concern may occur before any reduction in range is observed, so that determining and modelling the factors driving population size and trends is crucial to predict their future extinction risk [50]. In our study, distribution and dynamics of carrying capacity along with emergent density-dependent responses explained up to 76% of spatio-temporal density variability of juvenile and adult brown trout, but only 50% of YOY’s. By contrast, YOY trout were highly sensitive to thermal conditions, their performance declining with increasing temperature at a higher rate than older life stages, and disruptions being triggered at lower temperature thresholds.

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0081354