Research Article: Topical application of lidocaine or bupivacaine in the healing of surgical wounds in dogs1

Date Published: August 14, 2020

Publisher: Sociedade Brasileira para o Desenvolvimento da Pesquisa em Cirurgia

Author(s): Bruno Watanabe Minto, Laura Zanato, Guilherme Galhardo Franco, Fernando Yoiti Kitamura Kawamoto, Camila Potério Borsaro, Josiane Morais Pazzini, Elizabeth Regina Carvalho, Andresa Matsui.

http://doi.org/10.1590/s0102-865020200070000001

Abstract

To analyze the anesthetic drugs interference with wound healing when used in the surgical bed.

Macro and microscopic aspects of healing of surgical wounds were evaluated after instillation of topical anesthetics without vasoconstrictor or saline solution 0.9% as control in the transsurgical period. Thirty dogs, males and females were divided into two experimental groups. In both groups, two circular punch lesions of 6 mm diameter were performed in the abdomen. In group 1, lidocaine was instilled in one of the lesions and saline solution in the contralateral lesion. In group 2 the procedure was repeated with the use of bupivacaine. The macroscopic assessment of the lesions was performed on the first, third and tenth postoperative day. The excisional biopsy was performed on the tenth day and the samples were submitted for histopathological examination.

The macroscopic analysis had a significant difference between groups. Microscopic analysis was not significant between groups.

The topical application of lidocaine and bupivacaine in the surgical wound is feasible and it does not influence skin healing. The benefit of such a practice, which has been the subject of other studies, seems to outweigh the risks.

Partial Text

In the face of scientific, clinical and economic interests, wound healing is the subject of several studies and current research1,2.

This study was approved by the Committee on Ethics in the Use of Animals (CEUA), Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), campus Jaboticabal (Protocol number 22733/2016).

All patients presented closure of the surgical wound on the tenth day, when the stitches were removed and the excisional biopsy (Fig. 1). There were no cases of infection or any clinical sign of complication in the period in which they were observed.

According to Dogan et al.13, there is delay in wound healing with the use of lidocaine, and with the reduced tension strength of collagen fibers; other authors corroborate the macroscopic findings of this research, where no significant differences were observed between the healing processes14,15.

The topical application of lidocaine and bupivacaine in the surgical wound is feasible and it does not influence skin healing. The benefit of such a practice, which has been the subject of other studies, seems to outweigh the risks.

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1590/s0102-865020200070000001

 

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