Research Article: Validation of an instrumented dummy to assess mechanical aspects of discomfort during load carriage

Date Published: June 29, 2017

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Author(s): Patrick D. Wettenschwiler, Simon Annaheim, Silvio Lorenzetti, Stephen J. Ferguson, Rolf Stämpfli, Agnes Psikuta, René M. Rossi, Costin Daniel Untaroiu.

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0180069

Abstract

Due to the increasing load in backpacks and other load carriage systems over the last decades, load carriage system designs have to be adapted accordingly to minimize discomfort and to reduce the risk of injury. As subject studies are labor-intensive and include further challenges such as intra-subject and inter-subject variability, we aimed to validate an instrumented dummy as an objective laboratory tool to assess the mechanical aspects of discomfort. The validation of the instrumented dummy was conducted by comparison with a recent subject study. The mechanical parameters that characterize the static and dynamic interaction between backpack and body during different backpack settings were compared. The second aim was to investigate whether high predictive power (coefficient of determination R2>0.5) in assessing the discomfort of load carriage systems could be reached using the instrumented dummy. Measurements were conducted under static conditions, simulating upright standing, and dynamic conditions, simulating level walking. Twelve different configurations of a typical load carriage system, a commercially available backpack with a hip belt, were assessed. The mechanical parameters were measured in the shoulder and the hip region of the dummy and consisted of average pressure, peak pressure, strap force and relative motion between the system and the body. The twelve configurations consisted of three different weights (15kg, 20kg, and 25kg), combined with four different hip belt tensions (30N, 60N, 90N, and 120N). Through the significant (p<0.05) correlation of the mechanical parameters measured on the dummy with the corresponding values of the subject study, the dummy was validated for all static measurements and for dynamic measurements in the hip region to accurately simulate the interaction between the human body and the load carriage system. Multiple linear regressions with the mechanical parameters measured on the dummy as independent variables and the corresponding subjective discomfort scores from the subject study as the dependent variable revealed a high predictive power of the instrumented dummy. The dummy can explain 75% or more of the variance in discomfort using average pressures as predictors and even 79% or more of the variance in discomfort using strap forces as predictors. Use of the dummy enables objective, fast, and iterative assessments of load carriage systems and therefore reduces the need for labor-intensive subject studies in order to decrease the mechanical aspects of discomfort during load carriage.

Partial Text

During the last decades, the loads carried in backpacks and other load carriage systems have increased [1, 2]. As a consequence, load carriage system designs have to be adapted accordingly to minimize discomfort and to reduce the risk of injury. Discomfort during load carriage is a major issue relevant for e.g. infantry [3–6], school children’s or student’s load carriage [7–10], and outdoor activities [11–13]. The importance of discomfort is further underlined by its influence on user acceptance [14, 15]. Recently, a growing interest has been shown in the mechanical aspects of discomfort during load carriage: Piscione et al. [16] analyzed the effect of mechanical compression on shoulder muscle fatigue and Hadid et al. [17] modeled the mechanical strains and stresses in the soft tissue of the shoulder. Older publications by Holloway et al. [18] and Sangeorzan et al. [19] already investigated the relationship between external pressure loading and skin blood flow. Furthermore, a number of investigations reported a relationship between discomfort and the external pressure loading occurring during sitting activities, e.g. in car seats [20], or office chairs [21]. While most of these studies investigated static scenarios, the dynamic aspects of the mechanical loading may well play an important role for the perceived discomfort. There are still many unsolved questions regarding the mechanical aspects of discomfort.

The correlation coefficients comparing the mechanical parameters between the dummy and the subjects are shown in Table 1.

In this study, we aimed to validate an instrumented dummy to assess the mechanical aspects of discomfort during load carriage by comparing the mechanical parameters that characterize the interaction between the body and the load carriage system with corresponding values from a previous subject study [23]. We further analyzed the predictive power of the instrumented dummy in assessing the discomfort of load carriage systems, applying twelve different backpack configurations.

In this study, an objective and time-saving method to assess or compare the discomfort of load carriage systems and their design has been validated. The instrumented dummy can explain 75% or more of the variance in discomfort using average pressures as predictors and even 79% or more of the variance in discomfort using strap forces as predictors. Compared to an existing model [5], our model has a higher predictive power and it uses mechanical parameters as predictors that are directly validated by correlation with the same parameters measured in a human subject study [23]. Our model enables objective, fast, and iterative assessments during the development of new designs of load carriage systems as well as comparisons of many different systems or designs. As a consequence, the need for subject studies is reduced and users of backpacks and other load carriage systems may profit from future load carriage systems that inflict less discomfort during load carriage.

 

Source:

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0180069

 

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